Daniel Altman

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Daniel Altman is an American-born economist and writer. He is the son of Ann (née Körner) and Sidney Altman.

Career[edit]

Altman is a contributing editor and economics columnist for Foreign Policy (magazine), where he also edits the soccer commentary site Midfield General. He is the founder of North Yard Analytics LLC, a consulting firm that analyzes sports data for teams and other clients. He is also a frequent speaker (in English and Spanish) at international conferences on economics and investing. Altman teaches economics as an adjunct professor at the New York University Stern School of Business and serves as Chief Economist of Big Think.

Altman was formerly Director of Thought Leadership at Dalberg Global Development Advisors. He also worked for many years as a full-time economic journalist, most recently as the global economics columnist of the International Herald Tribune. Previously, he had been one of the youngest-ever members of the editorial board of The New York Times, under then-editor Howell Raines.[1] He was also on the staff of The Economist. Outside of journalism, he served as an economic advisor to the British government in 2003 and 2004.

His fourth book, Outrageous Fortunes: The Twelve Surprising Trends That Will Reshape the Global Economy was published in January 2011 by Times Books. His previous books are Power in Numbers: UNITAID, Innovative Financing, and the Quest for Massive Good, co-authored with Philippe Douste-Blazy and published in 2010 by PublicAffairs; Neoconomy: George Bush's Revolutionary Gamble with America's Future, also published by PublicAffairs, in 2004; and Connected: 24 Hours in the Global Economy, published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux in 2007. Both Outrageous Fortunes and Connected have been translated into many languages, including Chinese, Korean, Portuguese, and Spanish.

Mr. Altman received his A.B. magna cum laude, A.M. and Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University. While at Harvard, he was Editorial Board Chair of The Harvard Crimson.

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