Daniel Azro Ashley Buck

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Daniel Azro Ashley Buck
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives
In office
1829–1830
Preceded by Robert B. Bates
Succeeded by Robert B. Bates
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Vermont's 5th district
In office
March 4, 1827 – March 3, 1829
Preceded by John Mattocks
Succeeded by William Cahoon
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives
In office
1825–1826
Preceded by Isaac Fletcher
Succeeded by Robert B. Bates
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Vermont's 4th district
In office
March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1825
Preceded by Elias Keyes
Succeeded by Ezra Meech
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives
In office
1820–1822
Preceded by William A. Griswold
Succeeded by George Edward Wales
Personal details
Born (1789-04-19)April 19, 1789
Norwich, Vermont, U.S.
Died December 24, 1841(1841-12-24) (aged 52)
Washington, D.C., U.S.
Resting place Congressional Cemetery
Washington, D.C.
Political party Adams-Clay Republican
Spouse(s) Philomela C. Dodge Buck
Children Daniel Buck
Elizabeth Morse Buck
Ben Buck
Londus Buck
Parents Daniel Buck
Content (Ashley) Buck
Profession Politician
Lawyer
Military service
Service/branch United States Army
Years of service 1808-1811, 1812-1815
Rank Second Lieutenant

Daniel Azro Ashley Buck (April 19, 1789 – December 24, 1841) was an American lawyer and politician in the U.S. state of Vermont. He served as a U.S. Representative from Vermont and as Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives.

Early life[edit]

Buck was born in Norwich, Vermont, the son of U. S. Representative Daniel Buck and Content (Ashley) Buck.[1] As a child he moved with his parents to Chelsea. He attended the common schools and graduated from Middlebury College in 1807 with fellow classmates William Slade and Stephen Royce.[2] He graduated first in his class from the United States Military Academy in 1808, and was commissioned a lieutenant in the Engineer Corps of the United States Army.[3] For the next 3 years, he served as an engineer in the construction of Fort Wood on Bedloe's Island. He resigned his commission in August 1811 and began the study of law.

In October 1812 he was appointed a second lieutenant in the 3rd Artillery, which he declined. [4] He instead raised a volunteer company of rangers, and was appointed a captain of the 31st Infantry in April 1813. He was honorably discharged on June 15, 1815.[5] Following his discharge, he was admitted to the bar, and began the practice of law in Chelsea. He received a Master of Arts degree from Dartmouth College in 1823.[6]

Political career[edit]

Buck held various political positions in Vermont, and was elected a member of the State house of representatives in 1816. He served in the State House three times, from 1816-1826, 1828-1830 and 1833-1835. He was Speaker of the House from 1820-1822, 1825-1826 and in 1829.[7]

He was State’s Attorney for Orange County from 1819-1822 and 1830-1834. He was a presidential elector in 1820.[8] He was elected as a Adams-Clay Republican candidate to the Eighteenth Congress, serving from March 4, 1823 to March 3, 1825. He was then elected to the Twentieth Congress, serving from March 4, 1827 to March 3, 1829.[9] He was an unsuccessful candidate for renomination in 1828. He was a trustee of the University of Vermont and Norwich University.

After leaving Congress he moved to Washington, D.C. and served as a clerk in the War Department from 1835-1839. He then served as a clerk in the Treasury Department in 1840.[10]

Buck died died in Washington, D.C. on December 24, 1841 and is interred in the Congressional Cemetery in Washington D.C.[11]

Family life[edit]

Buck married Philomela C. Dodge on November 10, 1816.[12] Their children were Daniel Buck, Elizabeth Morse Buck, Ben Buck and Londus Buck.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Partridge, Henry (1905). A History of Norwich, Vermont. Dartmouth Press. p. 175. 
  2. ^ Partridge, Henry Villiers (1905). A History of Norwich, Vermont. Dartmouth Press. p. 175. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  3. ^ Ellis, William Arba (1911). Norwich university, 1819-1911: her history, her graduates, her roll of honor, pub. by Major-General Grenville M. Dodge. The Capital city press. p. 6. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  4. ^ Service profile
  5. ^ Heitman, Francis Bernard (1890). Historical Register of the United States Army: From Its Organization, September 29, 1789, to September 29, 1889. National Tribune. p. 155. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  6. ^ Dartmouth College (1890). General catalogue of Dartmouth college and the associated institutions: including the officers of government and instruction, graduates and all others who have received honorary degrees. Dartmouth College. p. 153. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  7. ^ University of Vermont (1901). General catalogue of the University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, Burlington, Vermont, 1791-1900. Free Press Association. p. 5. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  8. ^ Vermont Historical Society (1920). Proceedings of the Vermont Historical Society. The Society. p. 88. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  9. ^ Middlebury College (1917). Catalogue of Officers and Students of Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont: And of Others who Have Received Degrees, 1800-1915. The College. p. 9. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  10. ^ Ellis, William Arba (1911). Norwich university, 1819-1911: her history, her graduates, her roll of honor, pub. by Major-General Grenville M. Dodge. The Capital city press. p. 6. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  11. ^ Blake, John Lauris (1859). A biographical dictionary: comprising a summary account of the lives of the most distinguished persons of all ages, nations, and professions; including more than two thousand articles of American biography. H. Cowperthwait & co. p. 212. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  12. ^ Middlebury College (1917). Catalogue of Officers and Students of Middlebury College in Middlebury, Vermont: And of Others who Have Received Degrees, 1800-1915. The College. p. 9. Retrieved 3 July 2014. 
  13. ^ "Descendants of EDMUND BUCK". Ancestry.com. Retrieved July 3, 2014. 

External links[edit]


Political offices
Preceded by
William A. Griswold
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives
1820–1822
Succeeded by
George E. Wales
Preceded by
Elias Keyes
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Vermont's 4th congressional district

March 4, 1823 – March 3, 1825
Succeeded by
Elias Keyes
Preceded by
Isaac Fletcher
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives
1825–1826
Succeeded by
Robert B. Bates
Preceded by
John Mattocks
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Vermont's 5th congressional district

March 4, 1827 – March 3, 1829
Succeeded by
William Cahoon
Preceded by
Robert B. Bates
Speaker of the Vermont House of Representatives
1829–1830
Succeeded by
Robert B. Bates