Daniel Boman

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Daniel H. Boman
Member of the Alabama House of Representatives
from the 16th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 12, 2011
Preceded by William Thigpen
Personal details
Born (1974-12-07) December 7, 1974 (age 39)
Tupelo, Mississippi
Political party Republican (January–May 2011)
Democratic (May 2011-present)
Residence Sulligent, Alabama
Alma mater Auburn University
Birmingham School of Law
Profession Attorney
Religion Southern Baptist

Daniel H. Boman (born December 7, 1974) is a member of the Alabama House of Representatives, representing the 16th District.

Early life, education, and law career[edit]

Boman received an A.A. degree from Bevill State Community College, a B.A. degree in psychology from Auburn University, and a J.D. degree from the Birmingham School of Law.

Alabama House of Representatives[edit]

Tenure[edit]

Boman was elected to the state house as a Republican in the massive Republican wave that swept through the state in the 2010 elections, one which saw the Republicans take complete control of state government for the first time since Reconstruction. He defeated incumbent Democrat William Thigpen 54%-46%.[1] He attracted national attention in May 2011 when he switched parties and became a Democrat in protest of Republican support for an education bill.[2] Opponents of the bill argued that it was unfair to teachers facing firing or other adverse action.[3] In explaining his decision, Boman said: "During this current session I have seen this legislative body pass bills that I feel adversely affect what my people back home want, need, and deserve…I will never choose the Party over the people again."[4]

Committee assignments[edit]

  • Judiciary
  • Ethics and Campaign Finance
  • Tuscaloosa County Legislation[5]

2012 congressional election[edit]

Boman ran in the Democratic primary for Alabama's 4th congressional district, held by incumbent Republican U.S. Congressman Robert Aderholt in the 2012 congressional elections.[6] He did not have to give up his state house seat to run for Congress; Alabama state representatives serve four-year terms. He was defeated in the general election.

Personal life[edit]

Boman is married and has three children.[7]

References[edit]

External links[edit]