Daniel Chapman Stillson

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Daniel Chapman Stillson (March 25, 1826 - August 23, 1899) was an American inventor. He invented the modern adjustable pipe wrench.

Biography[edit]

He was born March 25, 1826 in Durham, New Hampshire. He was the son of William Stillson and Nancy Chapman. He married Ellen Raynes Davis on April 18, 1855.[1]

He was a machinist during the American Civil War and served on David Glasgow Farragut's first voyage as a vice admiral. At the end of the Civil War, Stillson returned to Charlestown, Massachusetts, and eventually he moved to Somerville, Massachusetts. He then worked as a machinist at the J. J. Walworth Company in the Cambridgeport section of Cambridge, Massachusetts. While at the J. J. Walworth Company, he developed his pipe wrench.[2] On September 13, 1870, he was issued his patent. Stillson was paid about $80,000 in royalties during his lifetime.[3]

He died on August 23, 1899, and is buried at Mount Auburn Cemetery in Cambridge and Watertown, Massachusetts.

Patent[edit]

U.S. Patent 95,744

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Daniel Chapman Stillson". Rootsweb. Retrieved 2008-06-28. 
  2. ^ "Daniel C. Stillson". bochynski. Retrieved 2008-06-28. 
  3. ^ "Wrenches". About.com. Retrieved 2008-06-28.