Daniel Kalinaki

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Daniel Kalinaki (born 1980) is a Ugandan journalist working with the Nation Media Group as Managing Editor, Regional Content.[1] At the age of 18, he joined the Crusader, a tri-weekly in Uganda; when it closed a year later, he found a home at the Daily Monitor, working as reporter, assistant radio news manager, deputy sports editor, associate editor, foreign news editor, news editor and investigations editor.

Kalinaki holds a BA in Mass Communication from Makerere University, and an MA in International Journalism from City University of London. He is a winner of the prestigious Chevening scholarship,[2] Sports Rookie of the Year, and the inaugural Tebere-Mudin Award for Journalistic excellence. Kalinaki's work has appeared in the East African, the New Internationalist, Africa Confidential, the Weekly Observer, MS Magazine, and on the BBC World Service radio. He also teaches journalism part-time at Makerere University. He is a member of the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists.[3]

In 2000, he co-authored with Glen Williams, Joyce Kadowe, and Noerine Kaleeba Open Secret: People Living with HIV and Aids in Uganda. This book, which was published by the UK Charity ActionAid, was the first piece of literature to trace the importance of a candid and open approach to help fight social stigma and discrimination towards HIV and Aids.[citation needed] Since then he has worked on several projects and documentaries on the subject.

According to the Human Rights Report 1999, Kalinaki was assaulted and harassed at the World Press Freedom Day by Ugandan traffic policemen at Wandegeya Police Station. Kalinaki was trying to take a photograph of a taxi (matatu) driver who had knocked a woman and had tried to flee a few metres away from the police station.[4]

Between 2003-2004, Kalinaki and The Monitor were twice taken to court by the Ugandan government to stop the publication of two controversial stories: the first detailed allegations that government officials had unduly influenced the constitutional review process, and the second was about a salary embezzlement scam in the country's armed forces, the Uganda People's Defence Force.

On August 12, 2009, Kalinaki was again questioned by the Ugandan Police for about six hours over the publication of contents of Ugandan President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni’s controversial July 15 letter on the politics in Bunyoro sub-region. Kalinaki, who swore a charge-and-caution statement under pending charges of forgery and uttering a false document, was later released on non-cash bond of 10 million Uganda Shillings.

It was the second time in 2009 that Kalinaki has been summoned to the CID to answer questions over stories published by the Daily Monitor Publication Ltd. No charges were referred in the earlier case, which followed a story that was critical of the conduct of the operation against the Lord’s Resistance Army.[5]

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