Daniel Lerner

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Daniel Lerner
Born Daniel Tom Lerner
(1917-10-30)October 30, 1917
Brooklyn, NY[1]
Died May 1, 1980(1980-05-01) (aged 62)[1]
Occupation Writer, Academic
Language English
Nationality American
Education B.A., New York University
Ph.D., New York University
Notable works The Passing of Traditional Society: Modernizing the Middle East

Daniel Lerner (1917 - 1980)[1] was an American scholar and writer known for his studies on modernization theory. Lerner's study of Balgat Turkey played a critical role in shaping American ideas about the use of mass media and US cultural products to promote economic and social development in post-colonial nations.[citation needed] He, along with Wilbur Schramm and Everett Rogers, were influential in launching the study and practice of media development and development communication.


Works[edit]

  • Daniel Lerner (1958) The Passing of Traditional Society: Modernizing the Middle East. New York: Free Press.
  • Daniel Lerner. (1972) Communication for Development Administration in Southeast Asia. Asia Society—SEADAG.
  • Schramm, Wilbur., & Lerner, David. (Eds.). (1976). Communication and change: The last ten years and the next. Honolulu, HI: University of Hawaii Press.
  • Lerner, Daniel, Lyle M. Nelson, and Wilbur Lang Schramm. (1977) Communication Research: A Half-Century Appraisal. Published for the East-West Center by University Press of Hawaii.
  • Lasswell, Harold Dwight, Daniel Lerner, and Hans Speier. The Symbolic Instrument in Early Times. East-West Center, 1979.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Shah, Hemant (2011). The Production of Modernization: Daniel Lerner, Mass Media, and the Passing of Traditional Society. Philadelphia: Temple University Press. ISBN 978-1-4399-0626-2. 
  • Henry Bernstein. (1971) "Modernization Theory and the Sociological Study of Development∗." Journal of Development Studies 7, no. 2: 141–160. .
  • John Durham Peters and Peter Simonson. (2004) Mass Communication and American Social Thought: Key Texts, 1919-1968. Rowman & Littlefield.