Daniel Martin Moore

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Daniel Martin Moore
Daniel Martin Moore
Moore performing on June 21, 2014
Background information
Born Elizabethtown, Kentucky, United States
Origin Cold Spring, Kentucky, United States
Genres Folk
Occupation(s) Musician, singer-songwriter, producer
Instruments Vocals, guitar, piano, banjo
Years active 2008-present
Labels Sub Pop
Associated acts Joan Shelley
Ben Sollee
Jim James
Haley Bonar
Daniel Joseph Dorff
Chris Morrissey
Justin Meldal-Johnsen
Website www.danielmartinmoore.com

Daniel Martin Moore is an American singer and songwriter from Cold Spring, Kentucky.[1]

Musical career[edit]

After leaving the Peace Corps,[2] Moore mailed Sub Pop Records a four song unsolicited demo in January 2007 and was signed by the label to record his first album Stray Age, which was co-produced by Joe Chiccarelli.[3]

In 2010, Moore joined with fellow Kentucky musician Ben Sollee to record an album titled Dear Companion, which was produced by and also features Jim James of My Morning Jacket and Monsters of Folk.[4] Dear Companion aims to create awareness of the problems surrounding mountaintop removal coal mining in Appalachia, with Moore and Sollee donating their artist profits from the album to Appalachian Voices in support of the organization’s national campaign to end mountaintop removal mining.[5] In 2010, Moore toured with Ben Sollee and Jim James with stops in Brooklyn and at the Newport Folk Festival where Moore also performed with the Preservation Hall Jazz Band.[6]

In January 2011, Moore released a gospel album, In the Cool of the Day, which was inspired by an old in-house Steinway piano he played during a studio session at WXVU Radio in Cincinnati.[7] To promote his new album, Moore toured the UK and Ireland with Iron and Wine in March 2011.[8] Also in 2011, Moore founded the record label Ol Kentuck Recordings. The first Ol Kentuck release was Maiden Radio's Lullabies.[9]

In May 2012, Moore released Farthest Field on the Ol Kentuck Recordings label. The album is a duo-project between Moore and frequent collaborator, Joan Shelley, a Louisville, Kentucky-based singer and songwriter.

In August 2013, Moore announced that his next album would be a collection of rare, previously unreleased recordings and collaborations with Jim James, Haley Bonar, Joan Shelley, and others. The album titled Archives Vol. I was released in October 2013 through the direct-to-fan platform PledgeMusic.[10]

Discography[edit]

  • Stray Age (2008)
  • Dear Companion (with Ben Sollee) (2010)
  • In the Cool of the Day (2011)
  • Farthest Field (with Joan Shelley) (2012)
  • Archives Vol. I (2013)

Production credits[edit]

  • Living Room - Daniel Joseph Dorff, 2011 (Produced, recorded and mixed as "DMM")
  • Ginko - Joan Shelley, 2012 (As "DMM")
  • The Quiltbox Sessions - Daniel Joseph Dorff & Ronnie Kuller, 2013 (Produced, recorded and mixed as "DMM")

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Musicians to Bring Their Songs, Environmental Cause to UT". The University of Tennessee Knoxville. Retrieved 20 January 2012. 
  2. ^ "Daniel Martin Moore: Optimistic Folk". NPR Music. NPR. Retrieved 20 January 2012. 
  3. ^ Murphy, Matthew. "Daniel Martin Moore Stray Age". Pitchfork. Retrieved 20 January 2012. 
  4. ^ Ali, Alisa. "Ben Sollee And Daniel Martin Moore: Folk Out Of Appalachia". NPR Music. NPR. Retrieved 20 January 2012. 
  5. ^ Diaz, Sandra (16 February 2010). "Ben Sollee & Daniel Martin Moore Making Music To Save Mountains". Appalachian Voices. Retrieved 8 February 2012. 
  6. ^ Needles, Tim. "Singer/Songwriter Daniel Martin Moore on Appalachian Influences, Coal Mining, and Much More". Short and Sweet NYC. Retrieved 20 January 2012. 
  7. ^ Bevan, David. "Daniel Martin Moore In the Cool of the Day". Pitchfork. Retrieved 20 January 2012. 
  8. ^ "Daniel Martin Moore tours with Iron And Wine". Retrieved 16 December 2012. 
  9. ^ "Meet Ol Kentuck". Ol Kentuck. Retrieved 8 February 2012. 
  10. ^ "Daniel Martin Moore: Archives Vol. I on PledgeMusic". Pledge Music. Retrieved 21 May 2014. 

External links[edit]