Daniel Nicol Dunlop

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Daniel Nicol Dunlop (28 December 1868, Kilmarnock, Scotland — 30 May 1935, London) was the founder of the World Power Conference, and a theosophist-turned-anthroposophist. He was an artist, and the father of Ronald Ossory Dunlop.

Dunlop lost his mother at the age of five and was brought up by his grandfather on the Isle of Arran. He eventually moved to Dublin where he befriended the poets Æ (George William Russell) and William Butler Yeats, and became active in the Irish Theosophical Society. He was also known to James Joyce, and gets a mention in Ulysses.

Dunlop later moved to America, and in 1896 was employed by the American Westinghouse Electric Company, becoming later assistant manager, and then manager of its European Publicity Department. In 1911, with Sebastian Ziani de Ferranti and others, Dunlop helped to found the British Electrical and Allied Manufacturers' Association (BEAMA) in London. While Ferranti became its first chairman (to 1913) Dunlop was at first its secretary and later its director. [1]

A year of two after World War I, Dunlop began to organize the World Power Conference, the precursor to the World Energy Council. Towards the close of his life he was elected independent chairman of the Electrical Fair Trading Council and chairman of the executive council of the World Power Conference.

Dunlop had dedicated himself to anthroposophy after meeting its founder Rudolf Steiner in England. Dunlop enlisted the help of fellow anthroposophist Walter Johannes Stein in the hope of founding a World Economic Organisation, but his death prevented this.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ J. F. Wilson, Ferranti and the British Electrical Industry, 1864-1930. Manchester University Press, 1988.[1]
  2. ^ Wright, Rebecca; Shin, Hiroki; Trentmann, Frank (2013). From World Power Conference to World Energy Council: 90 Years of Energy Cooperation, 1923 - 2013. World Energy Council. p. 12. ISBN 978 0 946121 31 1. Retrieved March 2014. 

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