Daniel Spielman

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Daniel Spielman
Born March 1970
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
Residence U.S.
Nationality U.S.
Fields Computer Scientist
Institutions Yale University
Alma mater B.A.: Yale University (1992)
Ph.D.:Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1995)
Doctoral advisor Michael Sipser[1]
Known for Smoothed analysis
Notable awards

Gödel Prize (2008)[2]
Fulkerson Prize (2009)
Nevanlinna Prize (2010)
MacArthur Fellowship (2012)[3]

Pólya Prize (2014)[4]

Daniel Alan Spielman (born March 1970, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania[5]) has been a professor of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science at Yale University since 2006. In October 2012 he was named a recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship, commonly known as the "Genius Grant".

Education[edit]

Daniel Spielman attended The Philadelphia School, Episcopal Academy, and Germantown Friends School. He received his bachelor of arts degree in mathematics and computer science from Yale University in 1992 and a PhD in applied mathematics from MIT in 1995 (his dissertation was called "Computationally Efficient Error-Correcting Codes and Holographic Proofs"). He taught in the Mathematics Department at MIT from 1996 to 2005.

Awards[edit]

In 2008 he was awarded the Gödel Prize for his joint work on smoothed analysis of algorithms.[6]

In 2010 he was awarded the Nevanlinna Prize "for smoothed analysis of Linear Programming, algorithms for graph-based codes and applications of graph theory to Numerical Computing"[7] and the same year he was named a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery.[8]

In 2012 he was part of the Inaugural class of Simons Investigators providing $660,000 for five years for curiosity driven research.[9]

In 2013, together with Adam Marcus and Nikhil Srivastava, he provided a positive solution to the Kadison–Singer problem,[10] a result that was awarded the 2014 Pólya Prize.

He gave a plenary lecture at the International Congress of Mathematicians in 2010.[11]

References[edit]