Danny O'Neil

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Danny O'Neil
Sport(s) Football
Playing career
1991-1995 University of Oregon
Position(s) Quarterback
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1994 Pac-10 Conference Champions
Awards
1994 Pac-10 Conference First Team
1995 Rose Bowl Co-MVP
2003 Rose Bowl Hall of Fame

Danny O'Neil is a former American football quarterback.

O'Neil was a star high school quarterback at Mater Dei in Orange County, California[1] and was heavily recruited by Alabama and USC but chose to play for Rich Brooks at the University of Oregon.[2]

Despite being a four year starter who set numerous passing records for the Ducks, O'Neil struggled throughout his career in Eugene. However, in 1994 O'Neil led the Ducks to the Pac-10 championship and a berth in the 1995 Rose Bowl, Oregon's first since 1958. Though the Ducks lost to Penn State 38-20, O'Neil set Rose Bowl records for most passes completed (41), most attempts (61), most yardage (465), most plays (74), and most total offense (456 yards), and was named the game's co-MVP with Penn State's Ki-Jana Carter.[3] He was named to the Rose Bowl Hall of Fame in 2003.[4]

O'Neil was named first team all-conference as a senior, leading the Ducks to three pivotal come-from-behind victories; defeating #9 Washington, #11 Arizona, and archrival Oregon State in order to win the Pac-10 Conference championship. He passed for 8,301 yards and 62 touchdowns in his career at Oregon and also led the Ducks to the 1992 Independence Bowl.

O'Neil was not drafted into the National Football League. He played part of one season with the Anaheim Piranhas of the Arena Football League before retiring from football to become a youth pastor.[5][6] He is currently a pastor in Eugene, Oregon, where he has ministered to players from his former team.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://articles.dailypilot.com/1999-10-20/news/export66208_1_danny-o-neil-oregon-state-rose-bowl
  2. ^ "Danny O'Neil: Once a Duck always a Duck". The Oregonian. 2011-07-06. 
  3. ^ "Rose Bowl Timeline". Pasadena Tournament of Roses. 
  4. ^ "Rose Bowl Hall of Fame". Pasadena Tournament of Roses. Retrieved 2007-11-06. 
  5. ^ "Transactions". New York Times. April 27, 1996. Retrieved 2007-11-05. 
  6. ^ Wheeler, Ken (August 15, 1995). "A Higher Calling". The Oregonian. 
  7. ^ Hockaday, Peter (March 14, 2003). "Pastors provide outlets for athletes' faith". Retrieved 2007-11-05.