Darcy Tucker

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Darcy Tucker
Darcy Tucker.jpg
Born (1975-03-15) March 15, 1975 (age 39)
Castor, AB, CAN
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 178 lb (81 kg; 12 st 10 lb)
Position Winger
Shot Left
Played for Montreal Canadiens
Tampa Bay Lightning
Toronto Maple Leafs
Colorado Avalanche
NHL Draft 151st overall, 1993
Montreal Canadiens
Playing career 1995–2010
Website DarcyTucker.ca

Darcy Tucker (born March 15, 1975) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey player, who played most of his National Hockey League career with the Toronto Maple Leafs. A sixth round draft choice, Tucker began his NHL career with the Montreal Canadiens. Throughout his NHL career he also played for the Tampa Bay Lightning and the Colorado Avalanche. Tucker was born in Castor, Alberta, but grew up in Endiang, Alberta.

Playing career[edit]

Tucker is one of three players, along with Tyson Nash and Ryan Huska, that were a part of all three Kamloops Blazers Memorial Cup wins in 1992, 1994 and 1995.[1] In 1996, while playing for the Fredericton Canadiens, he won the Dudley "Red" Garrett Memorial Award as the top rookie of the American Hockey League.

Tucker was drafted in the sixth round (151st overall) by the Montreal Canadiens in the 1993 NHL Entry Draft. He was traded to the Tampa Bay Lightning with Stéphane Richer and David Wilkie for Patrick Poulin, Igor Ulanov and Mick Vukota in 1998, where he played for three seasons before being traded to the Toronto Maple Leafs in 2000 for Mike Johnson.

Tucker became notorious on Long Island during the 2002 Stanley Cup playoffs after he lowbridged the New York Islanders' captain Michael Peca during game five of the first round.[2] The check blew out Peca's MCL and ACL on his left knee, ending his season and delaying his entry into the 2002–03 campaign. No penalty was assessed. In the offseason of 2006, the Leafs signed Peca for one season, making Tucker and Peca teammates.

On June 24, 2008, he became an unrestricted free agent after his former club, the Maple Leafs, bought out the remainder of his contract. On July 1, 2008, he signed a two-year deal with the Colorado Avalanche worth $4.5 million.[3]

On October 1, 2010, Tucker announced his retirement after 14 seasons in the NHL.

Awards[edit]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1991–92 Kamloops Blazers WHL 26 3 10 13 42 9 0 1 1 16
1992–93 Kamloops Blazers WHL 67 31 58 89 155 13 7 6 13 34
1993–94 Kamloops Blazers WHL 66 52 88 140 143 19 9 18 27 43
1994–95 Kamloops Blazers WHL 64 64 73 137 94 21 16 15 31 19
1995–96 Fredericton Canadiens AHL 74 29 64 93 174 7 7 3 10 14
1995–96 Montreal Canadiens NHL 3 0 0 0 0
1996–97 Montreal Canadiens NHL 73 7 13 20 110 4 0 0 0 0
1997–98 Montreal Canadiens NHL 39 1 5 6 57
1997–98 Tampa Bay Lightning NHL 35 6 8 14 89
1998–99 Tampa Bay Lightning NHL 82 21 22 43 176
1999–00 Tampa Bay Lightning NHL 50 14 20 34 108
1999–00 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 27 7 10 17 55 12 4 2 6 15
2000–01 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 82 16 21 37 141 11 0 2 2 6
2001–02 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 77 24 35 59 92 17 4 4 8 38
2002–03 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 77 10 26 36 119 6 0 3 3 6
2003–04 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 64 21 11 32 68 12 2 0 2 14
2005–06 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 74 28 33 61 100
2006–07 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 56 24 19 43 81
2007–08 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 74 18 16 34 100
2008–09 Colorado Avalanche NHL 63 8 8 16 67
2009–10 Colorado Avalanche NHL 71 10 14 24 47 6 0 0 0 2
NHL totals 947 215 261 476 1410 68 10 11 21 81

Personal[edit]

In 1998, Tucker married Shannon Corson, the sister of former NHL player Shayne Corson. Shayne and Tucker were teammates on the Leafs for three seasons, and Tucker frequently helped him deal with his panic attacks.[4] Tucker and his wife have two sons, Cole and Cain, and a daughter, Owynn.

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "Tyson Nash". Hockey Hall of Fame. Retrieved 2007-01-04. 
  2. ^ Split reference:
  3. ^ "Colorado signs Tucker". Slam Sports. 2008-07-01. Retrieved 2008-10-22. [dead link]
  4. ^ Kennedy, Kostya (2001-10-22). "Brotherly Love". Sports Illustrated. Archived from the original on 2007-07-29. Retrieved 2008-01-04. 

External links[edit]