Darkinjung language

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Darkinjung
Hawkesbury–MacDonald River
Region New South Wales, Australia
Extinct (date missing)
Dialects
Darrkinyung
Hawkesbury River–Broken Bay?
Language codes
ISO 639-3 xda
AIATSIS[1] S65
Glottolog hawk1239[2]

Darkinjung (Darrkinyung; many other spellings; see below) is an extinct Australian Aboriginal language, the traditional language of the Darkinjung people. It was spoken adjacent to Dharuk, Wiradhuri and Awabakal.

Name[edit]

The name of the language has various spellings:

  • Darkinjang (Tindale 1974)
  • Darkinjung
  • Darkiñung (Mathews 1903)
  • Darrkinyung
  • Darginjang
  • Darginyung
  • Darkinung
  • Darkinoong
  • Darknung

Revitalisation effort[edit]

Since 2003 there has been a movement from the Darkinyung language group to revitalise the language. They started working with the original field reports of Robert H. Mathews and W. J. Enright. Where there were gaps in the sparsely populated wordlists, words were taken from lexically similar nearby languages. This led to the publication of the work Darkinyung grammar and dictionary: revitalising a language from historical sources.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Darkinjung at the Australian Indigenous Languages Database, Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Darkinjung". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ Jones, Caroline (2008). Darkinyung grammar and dictionary: revitalising a language from historical sources. Nambucca Heads, Australia: Muurrbay Aboriginal Language and Culture Co-operative. ISBN 978-0-9775351-9-4. 
  • R. H. Mathews (Jul–Dec 1903). "Languages of the Kamilaroi and Other Aboriginal Tribes of New South Wales". The Journal of the Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland (Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain and Ireland) 33: 259–283. doi:10.2307/2842812. JSTOR 2842812.