Darren Eadie

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Darren Eadie
Personal information
Full name Darren Malcolm Eadie
Date of birth (1975-06-10) 10 June 1975 (age 39)
Place of birth Chippenham, England
Height 1.7 m (5 ft 7 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Youth career
Norwich City
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1993–1999 Norwich City 168 (35)
1999–2003 Leicester City 40 (2)
Total 208 (37)
National team
1994 England U21 2 (20)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only and correct as of 12:00, 14 September 2006 (UTC).
† Appearances (Goals).

Darren Malcolm Eadie (born 10 June 1975 in Chippenham) is a former professional footballer, who made his name as a pacey left-sided midfielder with Norwich City. He later played for Leicester City.

Club career[edit]

Norwich City[edit]

Eadie was a product of Norwich City's youth system and made his debut in a UEFA Cup match against Vitesse Arnhem in September 1993.[1]

He missed the start of the 1999–2000 season through injury, and in December 1999, as a result of Norwich's financial problems, he was sold to Leicester City F.C. for almost £3 million.[1]

Leicester City[edit]

He was to only play 40 matches for Leicester due to injuries, and he retired in the summer of 2003, aged 28.[2]

International career[edit]

In the summer of 1997, Eadie was called up to the England squad for the Tournoi de France.[1]

Retirement[edit]

In 2002 he was voted an inaugural member of the Norwich City Hall of Fame, which was established to celebrate the club's centenary. In an interview for the Norwich City matchday programme on 13 August 2005, Eadie stated that he had found retirement difficult, particularly as many of his friends were still playing professional football. It was reported in July 2012 that he had fought severe depression and suffered panic attacks.[3] Darren now co-presents The Mustard Show, a weekday evening magazine TV show for Norwich based Mustard TV.

Honours[edit]

Individual[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Steve Whitlam (7 August 2012). "Darren Eadie". Flown From the Nest. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  2. ^ "Darren Eadie: Fighting depression in football". New Statesman. 30 August 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  3. ^ James Scowcroft (12 July 2012). "Darren Eadie: Life after football - depression and panic attacks - Profiles - People". London: The Independent. Retrieved 2012-07-12. 

External links[edit]