Darren Hayman

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Darren Hayman
Darren Hayman.jpg
Darren Hayman performing in 2007
Background information
Birth name Darren Russell Hayman
Born (1970-11-30) 30 November 1970 (age 44)
Origin Brentwood, Essex, England
Genres Indie rock, Electronic, Folk rock
Occupation(s) Singer-songwriter, musician
Instruments Guitar,Ukulele, Piano
Years active 1995–present
Labels The Track & Field Organisation
Fortuna Pop!
Static Caravan Recordings
Associated acts Hefner
The French
The Stereo Morphonium
Darren Hayman & the Secondary Modern
Darren Hayman & The Long Parliament
Darren Hayman & The Short Parliament
Hayman, Watkins, Trout & Lee
Rotifer
Vostok 5
Website www.hefnet.com

Darren Hayman (born 30 November 1970, Brentwood, Essex) is an English singer-songwriter and guitarist. He is best known as the lead singer and guitarist in Hefner. Since Hefner disbanded in 2002, Hayman has embarked on a solo career and has released several albums.

Background[edit]

Hayman first made a name for himself as the lead singer and main songwriter in UK indie rock band Hefner, who were big favourites of the late John Peel. The band split in 2002, their discography numbering four studio albums as well as a number of compilations and a live album.

Hayman then released one album with The French and an EP with The Stereo Morphonium. Both were electronic projects.

The debut Darren Hayman solo album Table for One was released in early 2006. The following year Hayman released Darren Hayman & the Secondary Modern, his second solo album and his first album with a backing band. The band included singer-songwriter John Howard and Pete Astor, founder of The Loft and The Weather Prophets.[1]

In 2009, Hayman released the first part of his "Essex Trilogy", Pram Town. The second instalment came in the shape of Essex Arms in 2010, Hayman's first release on Fortuna Pop!.

During January 2011, Hayman undertook January Songs,[2] a project to write, record and release a song for every day of the month, collaborating with other musicians. This was followed by piano-driven album The Ship's Piano. Hayman also released a companion album to Essex Arms entitled The Green and the Grey.

In 2012 he released an instrumental album entitled Lido which was followed by the third and final part of Hayman's "Essex Trilogy", The Violence, his first with a new backing band The Long Parliament.[3][4] It is a concept album based on Matthew Hopkins's witch trials and the English Civil War.

His most recent album is Bugbears which was released in 2013 as companion piece to The Violence. It was his first with his backing band The Short Parliament.

Discography[edit]

See also the discographies for Hefner and The French

Studio albums[edit]

EPs[edit]

  • Caravan Songs (2005, Static Caravan)
  • Cortinaland (2005, Acuarela)
  • Ukulele Songs From the North Devon Coast (2006, Static Caravan)
  • Bad Policewoman/Your Heart (2007, Unpopular)
  • Eastbourne Lights (2007, Static Caravan)
  • Table for One: the Dessert Menu (2007, Track & Field)
  • Minehead (2007, Static Caravan)
  • Songs for Harmonium and Drum Machine (2008, P572)
  • Losing My Glue (2009, Track & Field)
  • I Taught You How to Dance (2011, Fortuna Pop!)
  • Christmas in Haworth (2011, Fika Recordings)
  • The Four Queens (2013, Fortuna Pop!)
  • Blue House (2013, Belka)

Compilations[edit]

  • Great British Holiday EPs (2008, Belka)

Other projects[edit]

Studio albums[edit]

  • Hayman, Watkins, Trout & Lee – as Hayman, Watkins, Trout & Lee (2008, Fortuna Pop!)

EPs[edit]

  • The Stereo Morphonium EP – as The Stereo Morphonium (2005, Filthy Little Angels)
  • Vostok 5 – as Vostock 5 (2012, Strelka Records)

Live albums[edit]

  • Madrid – as Darren Hayman & The Wave Pictures (2009, Belka)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Album page for Darren Hayman and the Secondary Modern, Darren Hayman Web site.
  2. ^ Tumblr for January Songs
  3. ^ "The Violence – Coming November 5th". Darren Hayman. Retrieved 16 September 2012. 
  4. ^ "Indietracks interview #16: Darren Hayman & The Secondary Modern". Indietracks Festival. Retrieved 16 September 2012. 

External links[edit]