Das (surname)

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Das (Punjabi: ਦਾਸ (Gurmukhi), داس (Shahmukhi); Hindi: दास; Oriya: ଦାସ / ଦାଶ; Assamese/Bengali: দাস; translation: devotee[1]) is a common last name in India, among adherents of Hinduism and Sikhism, as well as those who converted to Islam or Christianity. It is a derived from the Sanskrit word Dasa (Sanskrit: दास) meaning servant of God, "devotee," or "votary". "Das" may, most accurately, be inferred as one who has surrendered to God. In the Punjab region of India and Pakistan,[2] they generally belong to the Brahmin caste.[3] In Bihar and Bengal regions, they belong to Kayastha, Namasudra, Mahishya, Paramanik and other castes.[4] Those who are Rajputs are of the Kayastha caste as well.[5] In Bengali Vaidyas and Odiya Brahmins, the surname Dash (or sometimes Dass)is found. Vaidyas often have the double-barrel Dasgupta/Das-Sharma surname.

Additionally, the Das suffix was attributed to many a higher caste Kayastha who worshiped Lord Krishna during the Middle Ages. The prefix of their name consisted of one of the many names of Lord Krishna and a suffix Das was added to that.

Das is also a last name (with a different meaning and etymology; Das means "badger" in Dutch, from PIE *teks-) found amongst the Dutch of the Netherlands.[6]

Presently, initiated male followers of the ISKCON tradition adopt the last name Das or Dasa upon formally entering the ISKCON community. The present day usage of Dasa or Das in Hinduism is highly respectful.

Notable people with the surname Das[edit]

Punjab region[edit]

Sindh[edit]

Rajasthan[edit]

Uttar Pradesh and Uttarandkhand[edit]

Bengal[edit]

Other regions[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Essays And Lectures On The Religions Of The Hindus: Religious Sects of the Hindus V1. Kessinger Publishing, LLC. 2006. p. 353. ISBN 1-4286-1308-0. 
  2. ^ "Sikh surnames". Science groupsrv. Retrieved 2009-04-19. 
  3. ^ "Bhai Mati Das". Sikh Heritage. Retrieved 2009-04-19. 
  4. ^ "Das". Family Education. Retrieved 2009-04-19. 
  5. ^ "Pakistan Needs Tulip Revolution". OhyNews. Retrieved 2009-04-19. 
  6. ^ "Dutch Surnames". Sara L. Uckelman. Retrieved 2009-04-19. 
  7. ^ Singh, Pritpal (1 May 2013). "Mission Afghanistan" (in English).