DashCon

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
DashCon
DashCon logotype.svg
Logotype used at the official website
Genre Fan convention
Inaugurated July 2014 (2014-07)
Website
dashcon.org

DashCon is a fan convention catering primarily to users of the blogging service Tumblr, with a particular emphasis on fandoms that had developed among them.[1][2][3]

First held over the weekend of July 11, 2014 in Schaumburg, Illinois, the inaugural convention quickly became infamous for allegations of mismanagement among organizers; an alleged, abrupt demand by the hotel for an upfront payment of cash for use of its facilities; and celebrity guests being forced to drop out of the convention after they were informed by the hotel that they would be responsible for paying for their rooms.[4][5] A small ball pit placed in one of the halls became a meme after organizers offered attendees, along with raffle and concert tickets, an "extra hour" in it as reimbursement for a cancelled panel.[6]

Organizers for DashCon initially stated that they were going to hold a second DashCon in 2015 despite the issues faced by the inaugural edition, but officially announced via a Tumblr post in September 2014 that DashCon LLP was going to be dissolved and all its assets liquidated, meaning that they were not going to hold a second convention.[7] The post also denied claims that a similarly themed convention Emoti-Con was a relabeled DashCon.[7]

History

DashCon was originally announced in mid-2013 under the name Tumbl-Con USA; the convention catered to users of the blogging platform Tumblr, and was touted as the "largest gathering of Tumblr users to date".[8] The convention was to focus on works that have developed significant followings among Tumblr users, such as Doctor Who, Sherlock, Supernatural, and the podcast Welcome to Night Vale. The convention raised money through ticket pre-orders, along with a crowdfunding campaign on IndieGoGo.[9] Prior to the start of the convention, the name of the event was changed to DashCon to indicate that it was not officially associated with Tumblr.[10][11]

The convention is organized by DashCon LLP, a Hudson, Ohio-based limited liability partnership owned by Megan Eli and Roxanne Schwieterman.[8]

2014 edition

Overhead view of the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel, where the inaugural convention was held

The inaugural edition of DashCon was held from July 11 to 13, 2014, at the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center Hotel. Among the guests originally scheduled to attend were actor Doug Jones, webcomic artist Noelle Stevenson, and the cast of Welcome to Night Vale.[10][11]

On the evening of July 11 – the first night of DashCon – early reports began to surface from attendees that events occurring at the convention were poorly planned and attended, a vendor had left due to poor sales, and minors had been admitted into 18+ rated panels. The convention itself also began to experience unexpected financial difficulties: the staff of the Renaissance abruptly informed a DashCon staff member that they would need to pay $20,000 upfront for the use of the facilities, or shut the convention down. DashCon organizers had previously and contractually negotiated to pay the venue gradually throughout the convention, using ticket sales, rather than issuing an upfront payment.[10][11]

At 9:00 p.m. CT, as a result of this unexpected development, organizers began to publicly solicit donations among a crowd of around 1,000 attendees (itself much lower than the original estimate of 3,000 to 7,000 attendees),[8] and online via PayPal, to cover costs, with a goal of collecting at least $17,000 by 10:00 p.m. to prevent the convention from being shut down. Organizers suspected that the abrupt change in plans was because the hotel's management "[did not] like the people at the con".[10] Attendees were seen performing a three-fingered salute from The Hunger Games and chanting lines from High School Musical.[10] While organizers managed to raise the necessary funds, the incident raised suspicion among attendees over the possibility of the crowdfunding drive being a scam (which included disputes over the authenticity of an image released by a staff member showing the bill, printed on hotel stationery), or being further proof of the alleged mismanagement.[10][11][12]

Several guests – including Stevenson (who was forced to moderate her own panel because the scheduled moderator was absent), the Baker Street Babes (who produced an all-female Sherlock Holmes podcast),[8] and the Welcome to Night Vale cast – were also informed by the hotel that they would be responsible for paying for their own rooms, despite previously being told that the rooms would be paid for by the convention itself.[8] Stevenson would ultimately join the WTNV cast for the night in accommodations obtained via Airbnb. The appearance by the Welcome to Night Vale cast was ultimately cancelled; organizers reimbursed those who had purchased tickets for the panel with tickets to a raffle of various autographed collectibles, admission to a concert with the Chicago-based Doctor Who-inspired rock band[13] Time Crash, and an "extra hour with the ball pit".[8][10][11][14]

Reception and aftermath

The ball pit – roughly the size of a kiddie pool, in an otherwise empty concession hall – and the notion of an "extra hour" in it quickly became a meme among attendees and other Tumblr users, inspiring parodies.[8] Convention guest Mark Oshiro explained that the ball pit was "not a point of interest, it wasn't something a single soul talked about, and it was just a quirky thing that existed", and that "in order to support the idea that DashCon was a full, 100 percent disaster, every single detail was used to paint the con and the people at it as horrific failures of humanity".[10][11] Users also envisioned other large quantities of items that could have been purchased with the $17,000,[8] and a programmer created Dashcon Simulator 2014, a comedic simulation of the convention's ball pit.[15]

In the aftermath of the convention, a staff member of the hotel stated that the facility did enjoy their presence, while DashCon's staff promised to provide a more thorough explanation of what had occurred.[16] The Baker Street Babes reported that the hotel payment issue was, according to organizers, a mistake. Stevenson, whose hotel payment had not yet been resolved, defended criticism of DashCon by other users, arguing that they were unfamiliar with what typically occurs at a convention in the first place.[8][10][11]

Emoti-Con

In September 2014 the Daily Dot wrote an article where they reported on concerns that DashCon had renamed/rebranded itself Emoti-Con.[17] The writer noted that the two conventions were nearly identical in their themes, that Emoti-Con was to be held in the same venue that the second DashCon was to be hosted at, the Emoti-Con website contained much of the same text as the DashCon website, and that it was being organized by one of the co-creators of DashCon.[17] DashCon later denied that the two cons were the same via a post on their official Tumblr account, where they stated that while Emoti-Con was being organized by two of the three owners of DashCon, the two events are otherwise unrelated to one another.[7] One of the Emoti-Con organizers also addressed this via a Facebook post, where they also stated that the two conventions are unrelated and should be seen as separate conventions.[18] They also stated that Emoti-Con would be "functioning under a very different infrastructure than DashCon did, with a more experienced and well-rounded staff".[17]

References

  1. ^ "When Fandom Falls Apart: DashCon Edition". io9. Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  2. ^ Bachman, Lynne. "DashCon convention doomed from the start". Baltimore Post-Examiner. Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  3. ^ Keilman, John. "Bloggers mock stumbles at Tumblr convention". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  4. ^ Pearl, Mike. "YOU KNOW THAT TUMBLR CONVENTION THAT WENT TO SHIT? IT WASN'T THAT BAD". Vice. Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  5. ^ Carmino Tamburro, Paul. "Embarrassing Tumblr Convention ‘DashCon’ Branded a Scam After Raising $17,000". Crave Online. Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  6. ^ MacDonald, Heidi. "Ultimate when a con is crap: DashCon 2014 solicited people for money to pay the hotel bill while the con was running". The Beat. Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  7. ^ a b c "DASHCON UPDATE!". DashCon Tumblr. Retrieved 11 September 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h i Peterson, Eric (July 16, 2014). "Social media convention implodes in Schaumburg". Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, Illinois: Paddock Publications). Retrieved July 17, 2014. 
  9. ^ Constant, Paul. "The World's First Tumblr Convention Was a Disaster". The Stranger. Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i Baker-Whitelaw, Gavia (July 13, 2014). "Over the course of a weekend, DashCon 2014 descended into chaos". The Daily Dot. Retrieved July 15, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g Robertson, Adi (July 15, 2014). "DisasterCon: how a fan convention's big dream became a nightmare". The Verge. Vox Media. Retrieved July 15, 2014. 
  12. ^ Chipman, Bob (July 13, 2014). "Tumblr Convention 'Disaster' Unfolds at Illinois' DashCon". The Escapist. Defy Media. Retrieved July 15, 2014. 
  13. ^ Husain, Nausheen (July 26, 2013). "Doctor Who inspires local trock band". Chicago Sun-Times (Wrapports). Retrieved July 15, 2014. 
  14. ^ "DashCon Staff" (July 12, 2014). "Clarifications and backup plans". DashCon. Tumblr. Retrieved July 15, 2014. 
  15. ^ Person, Chris. "Magnificent Failure Of A Convention Now Has Its Own Simulator". Kotaku. Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  16. ^ Desat, Marla. "Tumblr Convention "Disaster" DashCon Gives Official Statement". The Escapist (magazine). Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  17. ^ a b c Romano, Aja. "The folks behind the infamous DashCon are back with a 'new' venture". DailyDot. Retrieved 4 September 2014. 
  18. ^ "Emoti-Con Indy response". Facebook. Retrieved 11 September 2014. 

Further reading

External links