Datarpur

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Datarpur State
दतरपुर
Princely State

c. 1550–1849
History
 -  Foundation of the state c. 1550
 -  Annexed by the British Raj 1849
Public Domain This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainChisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 

Datarpur State was a small precolonial Indian hill state in the Lower Himalayas. It was centered on the town of Dasuya, Hoshiarpur district, in modern-day Punjab. The state was founded around 1550 and was annexed by the British in 1849.[1]

History[edit]

Datarpur State was founded in the middle of the sixteenth century by Raja Datar Chand, a scion of the princely families of Siba and Guler who named the state after himself. From 1786 the state was a feudatory of Kangra State until Raja Govind Chand made an alliance with the Gurkha invaders from Nepal in 1806, securing his complete independence. Govind Chand was succeeded by his son Jagat Chand when Datarpur was conquered by Ranjit Singh of Lahore in 1818 and annexed to the Sikh Empire of Pañjab (Punjab), although a jagir was granted to Jagat Chand as compensation. But in 1848 Jagat Chand joined a rebellion against the British and was deposed, dispossessed and exiled to Almora. The territory of Datarpur was added to Siba State and annexed by the British Raj in 1849 as Dada-Siba. The descendants of Jagat Chand were given no jagir, but the royal house still exists.[2]

Rulers[edit]

The rulers of Datarpur State were Rajputs of the Katoch dynasy and the Dadhwal clan. They bore the title 'Raja'.[3]

Rajas[edit]

  • ca. 1550 - .... Datar Chand
  • ...............
  • .... - .... Ganesh Chand
  • .... - .... Chatar Chand
  • .... - .... Udai Chand
  • .... - .... Prithi Chand
  • .... - .... Jai Chand
  • .... - .... Dalel Chand
  • .... - .... Ugar Chand
  • .... - 1806 Nand Chand ?-1806
  • 1770-1818 Govind Chand
  • 1818-1848 Jagat Chand - in rebellion (died 1877)

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Great Britain India Office. The Imperial Gazetteer of India. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1908.
  2. ^ Mark Brentnall, ed. The Princely and Noble Families of the Former Indian Empire: Himachal Pradesh pg. 301
  3. ^ Datarpur (Princely State)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 31°49′N 75°40′E / 31.82°N 75.66°E / 31.82; 75.66