Dave Schulthise

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Dave Schulthise
Also known as Dave Blood
Born (1956-09-16)September 16, 1956
Died March 10, 2004(2004-03-10) (aged 47)
Instruments Bass guitar
Years active 1983–1995
Associated acts The Dead Milkmen

David Schulthise (September 16, 1956 – March 10, 2004), otherwise known as Dave Blood, was the bass guitarist for the punk band Dead Milkmen. He helped form the band in 1983 along with fellow pseudonymous musicians Joe Jack Talcum, Dean Clean, and Rodney Anonymous. Prior to this he was a Ph.D. candidate in economics at Purdue University.[1]

Allegedly, he tuned the strings of his bass guitar, in order from lowest to highest, D E A D, to match the name of the band.[citation needed]

He stopped playing music in 1995 after the band broke up as the result of developing tendinitis in both hands.[2]

Schulthise visited Yugoslavia while on tour with the Milkmen and became fascinated with Serbia, its culture and people. After the band disbanded, he enrolled at Indiana University to study Serbo-Croatian language, literature, and history. He moved to Serbia for work and study in 1998, but in the wake of the NATO bombing campaign there he was forced to return to the US.[3]

In late 2003, he told an interviewer that his favorite bassists were Mike Mills (R.E.M.), Johnny Gayden (Albert Collins Band) and Charles Mingus.[4]

Schulthise committed suicide by a drug overdose[5] on March 10, 2004, at age 47.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Dave Schulthise, 47, Dead Milkmen's Bassist". The New York Times. March 13, 2004. Retrieved 2008-05-22. 
  2. ^ Billboard (March 11, 2004). "Dead Milkmen bass player found dead". msnbc.com. Retrieved 2008-05-22. 
  3. ^ Deirdre Shaw (May 25, 1999). "EX-ROCKER TAKES ON ROLE OF REFUGEE FROM SERBIA". The Philadelphia Inquirer. pp. MD01. 
  4. ^ http://www.markprindle.com/blood-i.htm
  5. ^ "The Dead Milkmen return to pay tribute to the late Dave Schulthise.". Philadelphia City Paper. November 11, 2004. Retrieved 2010-02-13. 

External links[edit]