Dave Levac

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Honourable
Dave Levac
MPP
41st Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario
Incumbent
Assumed office
November 21, 2011
Premier Dalton McGuinty
Kathleen O. Wynne
Lieutenant Governor David C. Onley
Elizabeth Dowdeswell
Preceded by Steve Peters
Ontario MPP
Incumbent
Assumed office
1999
Preceded by Ron Johnson
Constituency Brant
Personal details
Born (1954-04-06) April 6, 1954 (age 60)
Brantford, Ontario
Political party Liberal
Residence Brantford, Ontario
Occupation Teacher

David Joseph "Dave" Levac (born April 6, 1954) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. He is a Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario who was elected in 1999. He represents the riding of Brant. He was elected Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario in 2011.

Background[edit]

Born in Brantford, Ontario, Levac was educated at Wilfrid Laurier University, Queen's University and Niagara University. He became a teacher in the early 1980s, and a principal in Brantford in 1989. Levac received the Canada 125 Medal in 1993, was named OECTA Distinguished Teacher in 1994 for his work in conflict resolution programs, and was named Brantford's Citizen of the Year in 1997 by readers of the Brantford Expositor. He also served as co-ordinator of Queen Elizabeth II's Royal Visit to Brantford in 1997. He was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal in 2002.[1] In 2011 he was awarded the Chevalier of the Order of Merit for his educational efforts with respect to the Ukrainian famine in the 1930s.[2]

Politics[edit]

Levac was elected in the 1999 provincial election, defeating Progressive Conservative candidate Alayne Sokoloski by 956 votes in the riding of Brant.[3] The Conservatives won a majority government in this election, and Levac sat as an opposition member for the next four years.

The Liberals won a majority government in the 2003 provincial election and Levac again defeated Sokoloski, this time by over 10,000 votes.[4] Levac was named chief government whip. Levac was re-elected in 2007, 2011, and 2014.[5][6][7]

On April 9, 2009 Levac, along with co-sponsors Cheri DiNovo and Frank Klees passed bill 147 – The Holodomor Memorial Day Act. This was the first piece of legislation in the Province’s history to be introduced with Tri-Partisan sponsorship. This historic legislation recognizes the victims of the Ukrainian famine.[2]

On January 25, 2010, Levac was named Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Energy and Infrastructure.

After the 2011 election, Levac was elected Speaker of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario. He beat three other Liberal members, David Zimmer, Kevin Flynn, and Donna Cansfield. Cansfield was an early favourite for the position but lost to Levac on a second ballot after all the NDP members voted in a bloc for Levac. No New Democrats or Conservatives put their names forward due to the delicate minority status of the Liberal government.[8] He was re-elected as Speaker after the 2014 election defeating four other contenders.[9]

Electoral record[edit]

Ontario general election, 2014
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Dave Levac 19,346 37.14 +0.06
Progressive Conservative Phil Gillies 16,041 30.80 -3.85
New Democratic Alex Felsky 13,992 26.86 +2.66
Green Ken Burns 2,095 4.02 +1.92
Libertarian Rob Ferguson 374 0.72 +0.30
Freedom Brittni Mitchell 179 0.34 +0.04
Pauper John Turmel 61 0.12 -0.07
Total valid votes 52,088 100.00
Liberal hold Swing +1.96
Source: Elections Ontario[7]
Ontario general election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Dave Levac 16,867 37.08 -12.10
Progressive Conservative Michael St. Amant 15,761 34.65 +5.77
New Democratic Brian Van Tilborg 11,006 24.20 +10.53
Green Ken Burns 957 2.10 -2.47
Independent Martin Sitko 244 0.54  
Family Coalition Daniel Hockley 237 0.52 -0.32
Libertarian Rob Ferguson 190 0.42  
Freedom Dustin Jenner 136 0.30  
Independent John Turmel 86 0.19 -0.38
Total valid votes 45,484 100.00
Total rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 195 0.43
Turnout 45,679 48.23
Eligible voters 94,717
Liberal hold Swing -8.94
Source: Elections Ontario[6]


Ontario general election, 2007: Brant
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Dave Levac 23,485 49.16 -2.93 $85,894
     Progressive Conservative Dan McCreary 13,787 28.86 -3.44 $55,566
     New Democratic Party Brian Van Tilborg 6,536 13.68 +1.70 $18,838
Green Ted Shelegy 3,272 6.85 $7,331
Family Coalition Rob Ferguson 403 0.84 $380
     Independent John Turmel 289 0.60 $0
Total valid votes 47,772 100.00
Rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 349
Turnout 48,121 52.69
Electors on the lists 91,333

Note: Percentage changes are factored for redistribution. Sources: Official 2007 Poll by Poll Results and 2007 Annual Returns, Candidate and Constituency Associations, Elections Ontario.


Ontario general election, 2003: Brant
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Liberal Dave Levac 24,236 54.55 $51,003
     Progressive Conservative Alayne Sokoloski 13,618 30.65 $49,989
     New Democratic Party David Noonan 5,262 11.84 $12,461
Green Mike Clancy 1,014 2.28 $1,012
     Independent John Turmel 295 0.66 $0
Total valid votes 44,425 100.00
Rejected, unmarked and declined ballots 286
Turnout 44,711 56.14
Electors on the lists 79,647

Sources: Ontario Election Returns with Statistics from the Records (2003) and Financial Returns, Candidate and Constituency Associations (2003), Elections Ontario.

Ontario general election, 1999
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Liberal Dave Levac 21,166 46.98 -
Progressive Conservative Alayne Sokoloski 20,210 44.86 -
New Democratic David Sharpe 2,889 6.41 -
Independent Graham Mcrae 495 1.1 -
Natural Law Eleanor T. Hyodo 294 0.65

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Golden Jubilee Medal". The Governor General of Canada. 2002. 
  2. ^ a b Ball, Vincent (January 24, 2011). "Levac made a Chevalier of the Ukrainian Order of Merit". Brantford Expositor. 
  3. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots by Candidate". Elections Ontario. June 3, 1999. 
  4. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots by Candidate". Elections Ontario. October 2, 2003. 
  5. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots Cast for Each Candidate" (PDF). Elections Ontario. October 10, 2007. p. 2 (xi). 
  6. ^ a b "Summary of Valid Ballots Cast for Each Candidate" (PDF). Elections Ontario. October 6, 2011. p. 2. 
  7. ^ a b "General Election by District: Brant". Elections Ontario. June 12, 2014. 
  8. ^ Howlett, Karen (November 22, 2011). "Ex-principal becomes Ontario Speaker: Dave Levac, who beat out three ...". The Globe and Mail. p. A11. 
  9. ^ Babbage, Maria (July 2, 2014). "Throne speech to lay out Liberals' long-term agenda, including pension plan". Toronto,, Ont.: The Canadian Press. 

External links[edit]