David-Matthew Barnes

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David-Matthew Barnes

David-Matthew Barnes (born September 3, 1970) is an American novelist, playwright, poet, screenwriter, and teacher.

Barnes is the bestselling author of the novels Mesmerized (Bold Strokes Books, 2010), Accidents Never Happen (Bold Strokes Books, 2011), Swimming to Chicago (Bold Strokes Books, 2011), The Jetsetters (Bold Strokes Books, 2012), Ambrosia (Pindelion Publishing, 2012), Wonderland (Bold Strokes Books, 2013), Stronger Than This (Bold Strokes Books, 2014), Fascination (Pindelion Publishing, 2014), Anything But Ordinary (Pindelion Publishing, 2014), The Marijuana Mermaids (2015), Stellar Runaway (Pindelion Publishing, 2015), and Fifty Yards and Holding (Bold Strokes Books, 2015).[1]

Two of Barnes' young adult novels, Swimming to Chicago and Wonderland, have been selected by the Rainbow Project Committee of the American Library Association as finalists for their annual Rainbow Books, a list of quality books with significant and authentic GLBTQ content for children and teens.[1]

Barnes writes romance novels under the name Wren Valentino, including Paso Doble (Pindelion Publishing, 2014), Romance on the Riviera (Pindelion Publishing, 2014), Miranda Chance (Pindelion Publishing, 2014), and Searching for Salvdaor (2015).

Barnes writes gay romance and suspense novels under the name Dylan Madrid, including Mind Fields (Bold Strokes Books, 2013), Love in the Shadows (Bold Strokes Books, 2014), Backstrokes (Bold Strokes Books, 2014), and Star Dust Lullaby (2015).

Barnes writes horror screenplays under the name Declan Mayfair, including The Attic, Baby Cindy, Death Do Us Part, Prey, Scare Me, Kill Me, and Under the Cellar Door.[1]

In addition, Barnes is the author of a collection of short stories titled Boys Like Me (2015) and two collections of poetry, Souvenir Boys (2013) and Roadside Attractions (2015).[1]

Barnes is the writer and director of the coming-of-age film Frozen Stars (starring Lana Parrilla of ABC's Once Upon a Time), which received worldwide distribution in 2003. He is the writer and director of the dramatic short film Threnody. He is the screenwriter of the romantic comedies Ambrosia (adapted from his novel of the same name) and Bitter and Sweet. He is the creator of the independent and crowd funded teen web series Bloom.

Barnes has written over forty stage plays that have been performed in three languages in eight countries, including And The Winner Is (Playscripts, Inc.), Are You All Right in There? (Playscripts, Inc.), Better Places to Go (Pinwheel Plays), Bracelets and Boyfriends (JAC Publishing), Clean (JAC Publishing), Don't Mention It (JAC Publishing), False Hopes (JAC Publishing), Frozen Stars (Pinwheel Plays), Johnny Ramirez Really Wants to Kiss Me (Pinwheel Plays), Pensacola (JAC Publishing), Sloe Gin Fizz (JAC Publishing), Somebody's Baby (Heuer Publishing), Temporary Heroes (Brooklyn Publishers), Threnody (Pinwheel Plays), and Unrequited (Brooklyn Publishers).

Barnes' stage plays have been official selections for the Chicago Director's Festival, the DC Queer Theatre Festival, FronteraFest, the Johannesburg One-Act Drama Festival, the Mid-America Dramatists Lab, the NYC 15-Minute Play Festival, the Rough Writers New Play Festival, and the Western Australia Drama Festival. His plays have been performed on stages across the country including the American Globe Theatre, the Boston Center for the Arts, the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center, Hyde Park Theatre, and the Producer's Club in New York City. Internationally his plays have been produced in Australia, Brazil, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and more.[1]

Barnes' literary work has appeared in over one hundred publications including The Best Stage Scenes, The Best Women's Stage Monologues, The Best Men's Stage Monologues, The Comstock Review, Cutthroat: A Journal of the Arts, Review Americana, and The Southeast Review. He has also served as the guest editor of dramatic literature for The Louisville Review and has written book reviews for the Lambda Literary Foundation since 2011.[1]

Barnes was selected by Kent State University as the national winner of the Hart Crane Memorial Poetry Award. In addition, he has received the Carrie McCray Literary Award, the SlamBoston Award for Best Play, and earned double awards for poetry and playwriting in the World AIDS Day Writing Contest. He has received national awards in the Split This Rock Poetry Contest and the New Works for Young Women playwriting competition. He is the winner of two Elly Awards from the Sacramento Area Regional Theatre Alliance, an award from Writer’s Digest, and an award from the Florida Freelance Writers Association.[1]

Barnes is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America,[2] the Horror Writers Association, International Thriller Writers,[3] the Romance Writers of America, and the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators.[4]

Barnes has been a teacher for nearly a decade, instructing college courses in writing, literature, and the arts.

He lives in Denver, Colorado with his partner, Edward C. Ortiz, the founding editor of 7 Word Review.

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Barnes is the oldest child of Samuel Barnes, Jr., a former police officer, and Nancy Nickle, the former exec of an underground hip-hop record label. His parents divorced when he was seven. Barnes has a younger brother, Jamin, (a San Diego restaurant owner, musician, and photographer), and three younger half-brothers: Jason, Andrew, and Jaren.[1]

Barnes is the eldest grandchild of businessman Clifford Harrison Nickle (1916-2002), who owned the Southwood Drugstore in Torrance, California for many years. After her death on Thanksgiving Day in 1997, Barnes founded The Dorothy Nickle Performing Arts Company in honor of his beloved grandmother. Members of the Nickle family founded The Nickle Arts Museum at the University of Calgary in Alberta, Canada.[5]

Barnes' great-aunt was actress Ann Paige who appeared in the films China Doll and The Young Lions (with co-stars Montgomery Clift, Marlon Brando, Dean Martin, and Hope Lange).

As a child, Barnes was a performing arts student at the Old Globe Theatre in San Diego, where he studied drama and dance.

Barnes spent most of his teenage years in the Bay Area of California where he attended Berkeley High School (classmates included Rebecca Romijn and Dave Meyers).

During his sophomore year of high school, Barnes was cast by Eric B. Productions as a series regular on their Saturday morning television show Dance Floor. Barnes, who was the youngest cast member, appeared on the show for one year.

Barnes was then cast in a supporting role in a production of the comedic stage play Once a Catholic, written by Mary O'Malley, which was performed at the Julia Morgan Center for the Arts.

At the age of fifteen, Barnes published his first short story, "The Children Are Crying" (a socio-political fictional account of four teens caught in the aftermath of a nuclear war), in the literary anthology Across the Generations (also featuring early work of writer Kim Addonizio).

Barnes later lived in Sacramento, where he studied dance at the Visual and Performing Arts Center (VAPAC) at Sacramento High School.

Barnes opted to postpone college and spent a year living in Europe, primarily in Greece on the island of Ios, where he worked as a dancer.

While attending college, Barnes was active in the flourishing theatre community in Northern California (fellow artists included Colin Hanks and Jessica Chastain), serving as the first resident playwright of the Thistle Dew Dessert Theatre, and directing and starring in over a dozen productions, including the West Coast premiere of Samuel Schwartz's Vito on the Beach.[1]

Education[edit]

Barnes briefly studied dramatic arts and creative writing at Sacramento City College, before attending American River College (classmates included fellow writer Anthony Swofford).[1]

After receiving a significant scholarship, Barnes moved to Chicago where he studied playwriting at the Theatre School at DePaul University (classmates included Julie Frost, Judy Greer, and Michael Muhney) and television production and fiction writing at Columbia College Chicago, before moving to the Atlanta area and graduating magna cum laude from Oglethorpe University with a degree in communications and English in 2006.[1]

In 2008, Barnes earned a Master of Fine Arts in creative writing from Queens University of Charlotte in North Carolina, where he studied under the mentorship of Brighde Mullins, Ashley Warlick, Cathy Smith Bowers, Rebecca McClanahan, Kym Ragusa and Elissa Schappell.[1]

Barnes is currently a graduate student at the University of Northern Colorado where he is earning a Master of Arts degree in Theatre Education.

Barnes studied his craft in private workshop with Tony Award and Pulitzer Prize winner Marsha Norman (‘night, Mother, The Color Purple, The Secret Garden) at the Southampton Writers Conference at Stony Brook Southampton in New York.[1]

In addition, Barnes has attended master classes instructed by Achy Obejas, Michelle Tea, Dorothy Allison, and Faye Dunaway.[1]

Actor[edit]

Barnes has performed in twenty-five theatrical productions including roles in Once a Catholic at the Julia Morgan Theatre in Berkeley, The Furthest Room at the Stella Adler Theatre in Los Angeles, Big Love at The Merriam Theatre in Philadelphia, in the west coast premiere of Sam Schwartz’s Vito on the Beach, and, most recently, as Mark in The Shadow Box.

Novelist[edit]

After meeting with author and publisher Radclyffe at the Saints and Sinners Literary Festival in New Orleans, Barnes signed a publishing contract with Bold Strokes Books. His first novel, Mesmerized, was published in November 2010. The young adult novel (set in 1986 in Sacramento, California) tells the story of seventeen-year-old Serena Albright who is coping with the violent death of her older gay brother, the victim of a hate crime. For Mesmerized, Barnes received a 2011 LGBT Rainbow Award for Best Coming of Age/Young Adult Novel.[6]

Barnes' second novel, a literary suspense thriller set in Chicago titled Accidents Never Happen, was published in July 2011. The novel is currently being adapted into a screenplay.

Barnes' next novel, a young adult novel titled Swimming to Chicago (the first to feature a gay Armenian-American teen), was published in October 2011. Swimming to Chicago was recognized by the Rainbow Project Committee of the American Library Association. The novel was a finalist for the 2012 Rainbow Books, a list of outstanding GLBTQ books for children and teens.[7] Swimming to Chicago was also short listed as a finalist for a 2011 Independent Literary Award.[8]

Barnes' fourth novel, a rock 'n' roll love story titled The Jetsetters, was published in September 2012.

Barnes' next novel, a comedic tale of a single woman searching for true love in Chicago titled Ambrosia, was published exclusively in eBook in September 2012. This novel is currently being adapted into a screenplay.

Barnes' sixth novel, a paranormal teen romance titled Wonderland, was published in February 2013. Wonderland was a finalist for the 2014 Rainbow Books of the American Library Association, a list of quality books with significant and authentic GLBTQ content for children and teens. The novel was also nominated for a 2014 Bisexual Book Award.

Stronger Than This, which is written in epistolary form and was published in February 2014, explores a friendship formed between a gay man and a lesbian when their soul mates are tragically killed.

Fascination, a novel Barnes describes as "a glamorous tale of theatricality and obsession", will be published in September 2014.[9]

Anything But Ordinary, a young adult novel about a high school student dealing with the aftermath of her mother's nervous breakdown, will be published in October 2014.

Barnes' first fantasy young adult novel, Stellar Runaway, will be published in January 2015.

Barnes' young adult novel, Fifty Yards and Holding, will be published in the March of 2015. The novel explores how the discovery of a secret relationship between Riley Brewer, the star of the high school baseball team, and Victor Alvarez, the leader of a violent street gang, escalates into a preventable tragedy.

Barnes is currently working on a new young adult novel, The Marijuana Mermaids, which explores the theme of female teen rebellion.

Barnes writes romance novels under the name Wren Valentino, including Paso Doble (Pindelion Publishing, 2014), Romance on the Riviera (Pindelion Publishing, 2014), Miranda Chance (Pindelion Publishing, 2014), and Searching for Salvdaor (2015).

Barnes also writes gay romance and suspense novels under the name Dylan Madrid including Backstrokes (Bold Strokes Books, 2014), Love in the Shadows (Bold Strokes Books, 2014), Mind Fields (Bold Strokes Books, 2013), and Star Dust Lullaby (2015).

Barnes' first eight novels (including two of his titles written under Dylan Madrid) were edited by award-winning author Greg Herren.

Playwright[edit]

As a playwright, Barnes first received national exposure when editor Jocelyn Beard included excerpts from his plays Are You All Right in There?, False Hopes, Number 76, Sloe Gin Fizz, and Threnody in several scene and monologue collections published by Smith & Kraus in 1999 and 2000.

Playscripts, Inc. published And the Winner Is and Are You All Right in There?, two of Barnes' one-act plays, in 2003. Shortly thereafter, his plays Temporary Heroes and Unrequited were published by Brooklyn Publishers. His award-winning teen drama Somebody's Baby was then published by Heuer Publishing.

In the summer of 2005, the Hope for Change Foundation produced the New York premiere of Barnes' one-act play And the Winner Is.

In 2010, JAC Publishing and Promotions published Barnes' popular stage play Pensacola, as well as his one-act play Clean.

In 2010, Barnes' all-female stage play Sky Lines received a world premiere at The Producer's Club in New York City. The production was directed by Margaret Champagne, produced by Tony White, and starred Meridith Nicholaev, Monica Lillian Jones, and Kasey Williams.[10]

Barnes' one-act play Baby in the Basement was an official selection for the NYC 15 Minute Play Festival, and was performed in the spring of 2011 at the American Globe Theatre, under the direction of Tony White.

JAC Publishing published Barnes' two-man play Sloe Gin Fizz in the summer of 2011.

In 2012, Barnes' gay-themed stage play We Never Made it to Paris received a world premiere at The Producer's Club in New York City. The production was directed by Kelly Barrett, produced by Tony White, and starred Thomas Lacey and Kurt Roediger.

That same year the Western Plains Theatre Company produced the Australian premiere of Barnes' stage play Somebody's Baby at the Dubbo Regional Theatre and Convention Centre.

Also in 2012, a collection of Barnes' one-act plays were published by JAC Publishing featuring the all-female scripts Bracelets and Boyfriends, Don't Mention It, and False Hopes.

In 2013, Barnes' two-woman one-act play Relocations (inspired by Alix Smith's photograph States of Union #3) was selected to receive a world premiere at the Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center as part of their Rough Writers New Play Festival. Shortly after the production, Relocations was published by the New York Theatre Experience's Indie Theater Now.

In 2013, Pinwheel Plays published eBook versions of Barnes' plays Better Places to Go and Frozen Stars. In 2014, they published thematic collections of Barnes' plays, including Brave Enough to Love: Gay and Lesbian Stage Plays, Deuces: Stage Plays for Two Actors, Monologues That Kick Ass, Now That I Have Your Attention: A Collection of Twenty-One Plays, and You Think You Know Us: Stage Plays for Teen Actors.

Johnny Ramirez Really Wants to Kiss Me Controversy[edit]

One of Barnes' signature pieces is the one-act play Johnny Ramirez Really Wants to Kiss Me, which tells the story of two teen boys falling in love.

In 2006, the script was selected by Stage Q in Madison, Wisconsin for their festival Queer Shorts. The world premiere was directed by Erik Weinke and starred Gilbert Villalpando and Nathan Figueroa.

A year later, the play received a New York premiere (produced by Frank Blocker and Sydney Stone) at the 78th Street Theatre Lab. The show was directed by Jon Michael Murphy and starred Chris von Hoffman and Bobby Abid.

In April 2008, the play was produced in Boston by Lyralen Kaye and Another Country Productions. As a result, the play received the SlamBoston Award for Best Play.

In late 2009, Kaye developed a new pilot program called Slams4Schools, in an effort to bring diversity-themed theatre to local Boston-area schools. She selected Johnny Ramirez Really Wants to Kiss Me for the program.

In October 2010, the play was then performed at the Roy Arias Studio Theatres in New York, selected for the Short Play Lab series by producer John Chatterton. Because he happened to be in New York for the world premiere of his stage play Sky Lines (performing at the Producer's Club, a nearby theatre), Barnes directed this production himself, casting Michael Paul Makin, one of Barnes' former students from Penn State, and Marcelo Carrascosa, a young actor who had performed in Barnes' one-act play Number 76 in Chicago at the Mid-America Theatre Conference.

By early January 2011, Kaye had Slams4Schools up and running. Eight plays were contracted to be performed at an all-male Catholic school in a suburb of Boston. The plays were assigned to student directors, cast, and the rehearsal process began with a planned performance date of April 6. One of those plays was Johnny Ramirez Really Wants to Kiss Me.

According to Barnes, "In early March, I received an email of concern from Lyralen. She was having problems with the school about my play. I shot back an email asking for clarification - what problems were they having exactly? Although the play had passed through a rigorous selection process, the administration wanted the kiss taken out of the script, references to the kiss to be omitted, and the physicality between the two characters (again...the kiss) to be struck. Lyralen defended my honor and my work. But, in the end, the play was pulled from the festival completely."

Two days later, the school cancelled the entire event. Barnes was forwarded an emailed copy of a plea written by the student (the only openly gay - and Latino - member of the selection committee who was determined to direct the script) and given to the school's administration.

Of this Barnes said, "This young man's words broke my heart...As an educator myself, I was disheartened by the school's decision specifically because of the broken message it sends to young people - especially those who need a play like Johnny Ramirez Really Wants to Kiss Me in their lives."

In response to the cancelled performances, Kaye and Another Country Productions scheduled the plays to be performed under the collective title SlamBoston UNCENSORED at the Boston Playwrights Theatre on November 14, 15, and 16, 2011. This production marked the first performances of the script to be directed by a woman, Caitlin Ann Stewart-Swift. The show featured performances by Francisco Marquez and Matthew Ian Eriksen.

In 2013, the play was an official selection for the DC Queer Theatre Festival in Washington, D.C. The production was directed by Alvin Ford.

The script is now being adapted into a screenplay.[11]

Poet[edit]

Barnes first published his poetry in 1995 in the literary journal The American River Literary Review. Since then, his poems have appeared in several magazines, anthologies, and literary journals including Chelsea Station, The Comstock Review, Cutthroat: A Journal of the Arts, Glitterwolf Magazine, The Southeast Review, and more.

In 2003, Word Riot Press published Sins of the Flesh, a chapbook collection of Barnes' early poetry.

In 2008, he received third place for his provocative poem Latin Freestyle in the national Split This Rock Poetry Contest. Later that same year, he won the World AIDS Day Writing Contest with his poem You Wonder.

In 2011, Kent State University awarded Barnes with the Hart Crane Memorial Poetry Award for his poem Walking to K-Mart to Buy a Dolly Parton Album.

In 2013, Pindelion Publishing published Barnes' first full-length collection of poetry, Souvenir Boys. In 2015, they will publish a second collection of his poetry, Roadside Attractions.

Screenwriter[edit]

Shortly after relocating to the Los Angeles area in 1999, Barnes appeared in a production of Paul Saucido's original stage play The Furthest Room, performed at the Stella Adler Theatre with co-stars Carlos Leon, Lysa Flores, and Lana Parrilla. Barnes then wrote and directed the independent film Frozen Stars (starring Parrilla and featuring Flores's music). After a screening of the film at the Director's Guild of America in Los Angeles, Frozen Stars was released in 2003 and received worldwide distribution.[12]

Barnes is the writer and director of the dramatic short film Threnody.[13]

Barnes is also the screenwriter of the upcoming romantic comedies Ambrosia (adapted from his novel of the same name) and Bitter and Sweet.

Barnes is the creator, writer, and producer of the independent and crowd funded teen web series Bloom.

Under the name Declan Mayfair, he writes horror screenplays, including The Attic, Baby Cindy, Prey, Scare Me, Kill Me, and Under the Cellar Door.

Academic career[edit]

In 2008, Barnes was nationally selected to serve as the Emerging Writer in Residence at Pennsylvania State University in Altoona, Pennsylvania where he taught in the English program for one year. While there, Barnes was also actively involved in the university's theatre program, participating as an actor in an award-winning production of Charles L. Mee's Big Love (directed by Robin Reese), selected by the Kennedy Center American College Theatre Festival to be performed at the Merriam Theatre in Philadelphia.

In January 2009, Barnes began teaching online English classes for Southern Crescent Technical College. In May 2010, he became a member of their faculty and instructed courses in English, humanities, and speech. In addition, Barnes developed the curriculum for the college's first-ever Theatre Appreciation course, which received statewide approval from the Technical College System of Georgia for instruction in 25 colleges. As of January 2013, Barnes once again instructs courses exclusively online for the college.

In November 2012, Barnes joined the faculty of the Spalding University brief-residency Master of Fine Arts in Writing Program where he mentors students in playwriting, screenwriting, and writing for children and young adults.

Currently, Barnes teaches courses in writing, literature, and theatre at Arapahoe Community College in Littleton, Colorado.

Filmography[edit]

  • Ambrosia (2014) - screenwriter, adapted from Barnes' novel of the same name
  • Bitter and Sweet (2014) - screenwriter
  • Frozen Stars (2003, worldwide distribution) - writer, director[12]
  • Just Before the Drop (2009) - written and directed by Sam Wagner (adapted from Barnes' stage play), official selection for The One in Ten Film Festival
  • Number 76 (2014, currently in post production) - directed by Sage Perisse (adapted from Barnes' stage play)
  • Threnody (2013, currently unreleased) - writer, director, music supervisor
  • Why So Fly? (2008, currently unreleased) - a documentary about Northern State (band) - producer, director[14]

Writing as Declan Mayfair

  • The Attic - screenwriter
  • Baby Cindy - screenwriter
  • Death Do Us Part - screenwriter
  • Prey - screenwriter
  • Scare Me, Kill Me - screenwriter
  • Under the Cellar Door - screenwriter

Television[edit]

  • Bloom (2014, currently filming) - series creator/writer/producer
  • Count Your Blessings (1998, pilot episode, adapted from Barnes' stage play Pensacola) - series creator/writer

Writings[edit]

Novels[edit]

  • Accidents Never Happen (Bold Strokes Books, 2011)
  • Ambrosia (Pindelion Publishing, 2012)
  • Anything But Ordinary (Pindelion Publishing, 2014)
  • Fascination (Pindelion Publishing, 2014)
  • Fifty Yards & Holding (Bold Strokes Books, 2015)
  • The Jetsetters (Bold Strokes Books, 2012)
  • Like Sisters (2015)
  • The Marijuana Mermaids (2015)
  • Mesmerized (Bold Strokes Books, 2010)
  • Stellar Runaway (Pindelion Publishing, 2014)
  • Stronger Than This (Bold Strokes Books, 2014)
  • Swimming to Chicago (Bold Strokes Books, 2011)
  • A Woman's Place (2016)
  • Wonderland (Bold Strokes Books, 2013)

Writing as Dylan Madrid

  • Backstrokes (Bold Strokes Books, 2014)
  • The Beautiful Lie (TBA)
  • The Edge of Desire (TBA)
  • Love in the Shadows (Bold Strokes Books, 2014)
  • Mind Fields (Bold Strokes Books, 2013)
  • Star Dust Lullaby (2015)

Writing as Wren Valentino

  • Miranda Chance (Pindelion Publishing, 2014)
  • Paso Doble (Pindelion Publishing, 2014)
  • Romance on the Riviera(Pindelion Publishing, 2014)
  • Searching for Salvador (2015)

Short Stories[edit]

  • Backfire (2010)
  • Boys Like Me (Short Story Collection, Pindelion Publishing, 2015)
  • Bruised (2007)
  • Easy on My Grave (1999)
  • Fifty Yards & Holding (2001)
  • Kitchen (2000)
  • Little Monsters (2012)
  • The Marijuana Mermaid (2001)
  • Patience is Waiting (2006)

Poetry[edit]

  • Roadside Attractions (Pindelion Publishing, 2015)
  • Souvenir Boys (Pindelion Publishing, 2013)
  • Sins of the Flesh (Word Riot Press, 2002)

Stage Plays[edit]

  • Better Places to Go (Pinwheel Plays, 2013)
  • The Bray of the Belles (Pinwheel Plays, 2015)
  • A Darling Among the Maidens (Pinwheel Plays, 2014)
  • Fractured (Pinwheel Plays, 2014)
  • Frozen Stars (Pinwheel Plays, 2013)
  • Hell with the Lid Off (Pinwheel Plays, 2014)
  • Pensacola (JAC Publishing, 2011)
  • Sky Lines (Pinwheel Plays, 2014)
  • Sloe Gin Fizz (JAC Publishing, 2011)
  • Somebody's Baby (Heuer Publishing, 2004)
  • Temporary Heroes (Brooklyn Publishers, 2004)
  • Vacancies (Pinwheel Plays, 2014)
  • We Never Made it to Paris (Pinwheel Plays, 2014)

One-Act Plays[edit]

  • And The Winner Is (Playscripts, 2003)
  • Are You All Right In There? (Playscripts, 2003)
  • Baby in the Basement (Pinwheel Plays, 2003)
  • Boxcar (Pinwheel Plays, 2013)
  • Bracelets and Boyfriends (JAC Publishing, 2006)
  • Clean (JAC Publishing, 2001)
  • The Clutch (Pinwheel Plays, 2011)
  • Defenseless (Pinwheel Plays, 2013)
  • Don't Mention It (JAC Publishing, 2008)
  • False Hopes (JAC Publishing, 1999)
  • Hour Glass (Pinwheel Plays, 2006)
  • I Ate Lunch Alone Today (Pinwheel Plays, 2000)
  • It's A Pleasure to Be Sad (Pinwheel Plays, 2007)
  • Johnny Ramirez Really Wants to Kiss Me (Pinwheel Plays, 2006)
  • Just Before the Drop (Pinwheel Plays, 2006)
  • Let's Not Confuse the Situation (Pinwheel Plays, 2005)
  • No Boys Allowed (Pinwheel Plays, 2005)
  • Number 76 (Pinwheel Plays, 1999)
  • Punch Bowl (Pinwheel Plays, 2006)
  • Relocations (Indie Theater Now, 2013)
  • A Rum Cake for Rita (Pinwheel Plays, 2005)
  • The Seventh of August (Pinwheel Plays, 2012)
  • Stay (Pinwheel Plays, 1996)
  • Taking Off (Pinwheel Plays, 2006)
  • That Bitch Brenda Stole My Lip Gloss (and I Want it Back (Pinwheel Plays, 2013)
  • Trixie's Last Date with the Boogeyman (Pinwheel Plays, 2005)
  • Threnody (Pinwheel Plays, 1999)
  • Unrequited (Brooklyn Publishers, 2004)

Stage Play Collections[edit]

  • Brave Enough to Love: Gay and Lesbian Stage Plays (Pinwheel Plays, 2014)
  • Deuces: Stage Plays for Two Actors (Pinwheel Plays, 2014)
  • Monologues That Kick Ass (Pinwheel Plays, 2013)
  • Now That I Have Your Attention: A Collection of Twenty-One Stage Plays (Pinwheel Plays, 2014)
  • You Think You Know Us: Stage Plays for Teen Actors (Pinwheel Plays, 2014)

Featured Work[edit]

  • 60 Seconds to Shine: 221 One-Minute Monologues for Men (Smith & Kraus, 2006; edited by John Capecci and Irene Ziegler Aston; featuring a monologue from Better Places to Go)
  • 60 Seconds to Shine: 221 One-Minute Monologues for Women (Smith & Kraus, 2006; edited by John Capecci and Irene Ziegler Aston; featuring monologues from And The Winner Is and Baby in the Basement)
  • A&U: America's AIDS Magazine (September/October 2008; edited by Chael Needle; featuring the one-act play Don't Mention It)
  • A&U: America's AIDS Magazine (December 2011; edited Brent Calderwood; featuring the poem Strength Comes From Knowing)
  • Audition Arsenal for Men in Their 20s (Smith & Kraus, 2005; edited by Janet B. Milstein; featuring monologues from I Ate Lunch Alone Today and Sloe Gin Fizz)
  • Audition Arsenal for Women in Their 20s (Smith & Kraus, 2005; edited by Janet B. Milstein; featuring monologues from Better Places to Go, Pensacola, Sky Lines, Temporary Heroes, and Threnody)
  • Audition Arsenal for Women in Their 30s (Smith & Kraus, 2005; edited by Janet B. Milstein; featuring a monologue from Better Places to Go)
  • Audition Monologues for Young Women #2: More Contemporary Auditions for Aspiring Actresses (Meriwether Publishing, 2013; edited by Gerald Lee Ratliff; featuring monologues from Baby in the Basement and Better Places to Go)
  • The Best Men's Stage Monologues of 1999 (Smith & Kraus, 1999; edited by Jocelyn Beard; featuring a monologue Threnody)
  • The Best Stage Scenes of 1999 (Smith & Kraus, 1999; edited by Jocelyn Beard; featuring a scene from Threnody)
  • The Best Women's Stage Monologues of 1999 (Smith & Kraus, 1999; edited by Jocelyn Beard; featuring monologues from Are You All Right in There? and Threnody)
  • The Best Men's Stage Monologues of 2000 (Smith & Kraus, 2000; edited by Jocelyn Beard; featuring two monologues from Sloe Gin Fizz)
  • The Best Stage Scenes of 2000 (Smith & Kraus, 2000; edited by Jocelyn Beard; featuring Number 76)
  • The Best Women's Stage Monologues of 2000 (Smith & Kraus, 2000; edited by Jocelyn Beard; featuring a monologue from False Hopes)
  • The Best Women's Stage Monologues of 2002 (Smith & Kraus, 2002; edited by D.L. Lepidus; featuring three monologues from Frozen Stars)
  • Between (Chelsea Station Editions, December 2013; edited by Jameson Currier; featuring the poem Blue Navy)
  • The Centrifugal Eye (November 2008; edited by Eve Hanninen; featuring the poem Caution)
  • Chelsea Station (Issue 4, May 2013; edited by Jameson Currier; featuring the poem This Man's Watch)
  • The Comstock Review (Winter 2008; edited by John M. Bellinger; featuring the poem Rapture)
  • Glitterwolf Magazine (London; Issue Two; October 2012; edited by Matt Cresswell; featuring the poems I Want To Travel Your Body and Volatile)
  • ImageOutWrite: A Celebration of GLBTQ Writing (September 2012; edited by Gregory Gerard and KaeLyn Rich; featuring the poems Latin Freestyle, The Day I Almost Ran Away with Goldie Hawn, and In Spite of It All)
  • inscape (2009; edited by Michelle Lassiter and Leif Anderson; published by Washburn University; featuring the poem El Novio)
  • Men of Mystery: Homoerotic Tales of Intrigue and Suspense (Haworth Press, 2007; edited by Sean Meriwether and Greg Wharton; featuring the short story Bruised; Lambda Literary Award nominee)
  • Polari (Issue 3, April 2011; edited by D.J. Baker and Sharon Dunne; featuring the one-act play Johnny Ramirez Really Wants to Kiss Me)
  • Red Booth Review (Volume 6:3, September 2011; edited by W.T. Pfefferle; featuring the poem Harm's Way)
  • Review Americana (Fall 2010, Volume 5, Issue 2; edited by Leslie Kreiner Wilson; featuring the one-act play It's a Pleasure to Be Sad)
  • Rite of Passage: Tales of Backpacking 'Round Europe (Lonely Planet, 2003; edited by Lisa Johnson; featuring the memoir essay And I Loved A Soldier)
  • Saints & Sinners 2011: New Fiction from the Festival (Rebel Satori Press, 2011; edited by Amie M. Evans and Paul J. Willis; featuring the short story Backfire)
  • Small-Town Gay: Essays on Family Life Beyond the Big City (Kerlak Publishing, 2004 ; edited by Elizbaeth Newman; featuring the essay The Lady of the House; Lambda Literary Award nominee)
  • The Southeast Review (Volume 29.2, 2011; Katie Cortese, Editor; Jen Schomburg Kanke, Poetry Editor; featuring the poem Walking to K-Mart to Buy a Dolly Parton Album)
  • Time Intertwined (Kerlak Publishing, 2006 ; edited by Mark Fitzgerald; featuring the short story Patience is Waiting)
  • Wicked Alice (Fall 2009; edited by Kristy Bowen; featuring the poem Ape Girl - a poetic tribute to Jessica Lange)
  • Winners Competition Series V.4: Award-Winning, 90-Second Comic Scenes Ages 13-18 (Smith & Kraus, 2010; edited by Janet B. Milstein; featuring the scenes One Stupid Moment and Backstage Pass)
  • Young Women's Monologues from Contemporary Plays #2 (Meriwether Publishing, 2008; edited by Gerald Lee Ratliff; featuring a monologue from Better Places to Go)

Awards[edit]

  • 2014, Nominee, Bisexual Book Awards, Bisexual YA Fiction, Wonderland
  • 2014, Finalist, American Library Association, Rainbow Books, GLBTQ Books for Children and Teens, Wonderland
  • 2012: Finalist, American Library Association, Rainbow Books, GLBTQ Books for Children and Teens, Swimming to Chicago
  • 2012: Finalist, ILA (Independent Literary Award), Swimming to Chicago
  • 2011: LGBT Rainbow Awards, Best LGBT Coming of Age/Young Adult Novel, Mesmerized
  • 2011: Hart Crane Memorial Poetry Award, Walking to K-Mart to Buy a Dolly Parton Album
  • 2011: Saints and Sinners Short Fiction Contest, Finalist, Backfire (Selected by John Berendt)
  • 2008: World AIDS Day Writing Contest, Don't Mention It (play) and You Wonder (poem)
  • 2008: Slam Boston Award, Best Stage Play, Johnny Ramirez Really Wants To Kiss Me
  • 2008 Split This Rock Poetry Contest, 3rd Place, Latin Freestyle
  • 2007 New Works for Young Women, 3rd Place, Sky Lines
  • 2007: Carrie McCray Literary Award, Best Stage Play, Bracelets and Boyfriends
  • 2003: Elly Award, Best Original Script, Better Places To Go
  • 1997: Elly Award, Best Original Script, Somebody's Baby

References[edit]

External links[edit]