David Adams (Labour politician)

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For other people named David Adams, see David Adams (disambiguation).

David Adams (27 June 1871 – 16 August 1943) was a British Labour politician who served as a Member of Parliament (MP from 1922 to 1923, and from 1935 to his death in 1943.

He was educated at the School of Art and Science at Newcastle's Armstrong College.[1] He took up a career as an engineer with the local shipping company of D. Adams and Company and the Anglo-Scottish Trading Company. In 1902 he was elected to Newcastle City Council, and held the office of sheriff in 1922-1923 and lord mayor in 1930-31.[1]

At the 1918 general election, he was an unsuccessful candidate in the new Newcastle upon Tyne West constituency, losing to the Liberal Party cabinet minister Edward Shortt. Shortt stood down at the 1922 general election, and Adams won the seat with a majority of only 156, over the National Liberal candidate Cecil Ramage. At the 1923 election Ramage took the seat with a majority of over 3,500.[1]

Adams unsuccessfully contested City of York at the 1924 general election, and Barrow-in-Furness at the 1931 contest.[1] He returned to the House of Commons at the 1935 general election, as Member of Parliament for Consett, County Durham, gaining a majority of 7,522 over the National Liberals.[1]

Personal life[edit]

Adams married Elizabeth Havelock Patterson in 1897; the couple had two sons and a daughter.[1]

Death[edit]

He died at his home at Jesmond, Newcastle in August 1943, aged 72.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Obituary: Mr David Adams M.P.", The Times, 17 August 1943, p. 6

External links[edit]

Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Edward Shortt
Member of Parliament for Newcastle upon Tyne West
19221923
Succeeded by
Cecil Ramage
Preceded by
John Purcell Dickie
Member of Parliament for Consett
19351943
Succeeded by
James Edward Glanville