David Alan Miller

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For other people named David Miller, see David Miller (disambiguation).
David Alan Miller
Also known as Cowboy Dave
Genres Classical, Avant-garde rock, Funk, Folk
Years active 1989 to present
Associated acts Albany Symphony Orchestra, Dogs of Desire
Website David Alan Miller at the ASO

David Alan Miller (born 1961 in Los Angeles, California) is a prominent American classical music symphony orchestra conductor, and for the past several years, the conductor of the Albany Symphony Orchestra.

Early career and education[edit]

Miller was raised in the Los Angeles area. He graduated with a bachelor’s degree from the University of California, Berkeley. He then earned a master’s degree in orchestral conducting from The Juilliard School. Miller was Music Director of the New York Youth Symphony from 1982 to 1988. He was also a two-term conducting fellow at the Los Angeles Philharmonic Institute.[1]

In 1987, he was appointed as Assistant Conductor of the Los Angeles Philharmonic by Music Director André Previn; he was later promoted to Associate Conductor in 1990 and held that position for two years. During his tenure with the orchestra, he conducted children's concert, "Green Umbrella" New Music Group concerts, and community concerts, along with regular programs at the Hollywood Bowl. In the fall of 1987, Miller replaced Previn on only 36-hours notice during a week of regular Philharmonic subscription concerts when the Music Director fell ill.[2][3][4]

Albany Symphony Orchestra[edit]

Miller has been musical director and conductor of the Albany Symphony Orchestra (ASO) since 1992.[5]

Under his leadership, the ASO has frequently premiered new American modern classical music.[6][7]

Miller commissioned a violin concerto from Kevin Beavers inspired by William Kennedy's novel, Roscoe. This piece, called Eyeball High, was conceived in 2004 and first performed on April 20, 2007, at Palace Theatre, Albany.[8][9]

Guest conducting slots[edit]

Miller is a frequent guest conductor for other orchestras,[5] including Chicago Symphony Orchestra,[10] the Oregon Symphony,[11] Massachusetts Institute of Technology orchestra,[12] and, from 1999 to 2007, for the Minnesota Orchestra's Casual Classics series.[13] He has also returned to the Los Angeles Philharmonic on occasion to conduct them during their summer season at the Hollywood Bowl.[14]

Awards[edit]

Miller received Columbia University's Ditson Conductor's Award in 2003.[7] This award is "the oldest award honoring conductors for their commitment to American music, (and) was established in 1945 by the Alice M. Ditson Fund at Columbia. Past recipients include Leonard Bernstein, Eugene Ormandy, JoAnn Falletta, Michael Tilson Thomas and James DePreist."[7]

Recordings[edit]

Miller has had many of his recordings with the ASO published as CD's. Many of Miller's recordings with the ASO are sold online.[15][16][17]

Reviews[edit]

Critics have generally given favorable reviews to Miller's performances. Some favorable reviews have been from MIT's The Tech,[18] the Schenectady Daily Gazette,[19] and the Albany Times-Union.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Henken, John (1991-10-03). "INSTITUTE'S SUMMER RIVALS". Los Angeles Times. 
  2. ^ Anthony, Michael (1992-10-07). "Kids' programs make him Super Conductor". Star Tribune (Minneapolis, MN). 
  3. ^ Albany Symphony Orchestra official web site. Accessed January 4, 2008.[dead link]
  4. ^ Hollywood Bowl official web site Artist web page. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  5. ^ a b Albany Symphony Orchestra official web site About web page. Accessed January 4, 2008.[dead link]
  6. ^ Albany Symphony Orchestra official web site. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  7. ^ a b c Columbia U. Official web site Ditson Awards page. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  8. ^ Geraldine Freedman, "The musical poetry of Roscoe", Schenectady Daily Gazette, April 15, 2007.
  9. ^ a b Joseph Dalton, "Political Scores: treachery echoes in Roscoe concerto, as William Kennedy takes stage, Albany Times-Union, April 15, 2007.
  10. ^ Chicago Symphony Orchestra official web site Press Release. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  11. ^ Oregon Symphony official web site press release. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  12. ^ MIT Tech official web site. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  13. ^ Minnesota Orchestra official web site. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  14. ^ Hollywood Bowl official web site. Accessed February 28, 2008.
  15. ^ Arkiv Classical Music web site. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  16. ^ CD Universe web site. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  17. ^ Amazon.com web site. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  18. ^ Bogdan Fedeles, CLASSICAL REVIEW: A Splendid Season Finale: David Alan Miller Brings Better Brahms to MITSO, The Tech, May 13, 2003, (MIT Newspaper), found at MIT Tech official web site. Accessed January 4, 2008.
  19. ^ Geraldine Freedman, "The musical poetry of Roscoe", Daily Gazette, April 15, 2007.

External links[edit]