David Aucagne

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David Aucagne
Personal information
Date of birth (1973-02-14) 14 February 1973 (age 41)
Place of birth Vichy, France
Height 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in)
Weight 72 kg
Youth clubs
Years Club
-1991 Vichy
Senior clubs*
Years Club Apps (points)
1991-1996
1996-2001
2001-2002
2002-2004
2004-2005
2005-2007
2007-2008
PUC
Pau
Toulouse
Pau
Grenoble
Montpellier
Pau



27 (330)
29 (271)
40 (251)
11 0(42)
Representative teams**
1997-1999 France 15 0(38)
Representative teams coached
2008- France under-20
* Professional club appearances and points
counted for domestic first grade only.
** Representative team caps and points correct
as of 18:15, 28 February 2010 (UTC).

David Aucagne (born 14 February 1973) is a retired French rugby union player. Aucagne, who played at fly-half, has been the coach of the French under-20 team since retiring in 2008.[1] He made his debut for France against Wales on 15 February 1997.[2]

Biography[edit]

Aucagne played for Vichy, his hometown team, as a youngster, but he moved to Paris Université Club, where he was coached by Daniel Herrero, in 1991.[3] He spent five years with Paris before being offered the opportunity to play at a higher level with Pau.[3] With Pau he won the Challenge Yves du Manoir in 1997, this was the only major trophy he won during his career.[4] Aucagne later had spells with Toulouse, Grenoble and Montpellier.[5]

Aucagne made his international debut during the 1997 Five Nations Championship,[2] in which France completed the Grand Slam.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "6N: Under-20, Round 1". rugby365.com. Retrieved 28 February 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "David Aucagne". ESPN. 4 February 2010. Retrieved 28 February 2010. 
  3. ^ a b "David Aucagne, son rugby colle à Pau" (in French). L'Humanité. 17 May 1997. Retrieved 28 February 2010. [dead link]
  4. ^ "Pau nous rejoue les cinq dernières minutes" (in French). L'Humanité. 28 April 1997. Retrieved 28 February 2010. [dead link]
  5. ^ "Aucagne David" (in French). itsrugby.fr. Retrieved 28 February 2010. 
  6. ^ "Roll of honour". The Guardian. 11 January 2005. Retrieved 28 February 2010. 

External links[edit]