David C. Coates

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David C. Coates
Lieutenant Governor of Colorado
In office
1901–1902
Governor James Bradley Orman
Preceded by Francis Patrick Carney
Succeeded by Warren A. Haggott
Personal details
Born (1868-08-09)August 9, 1868
Brandon, County Durham, England
Died January 17, 1933(1933-01-17) (aged 64)
North Hollywood, California, U.S.
Political party Democratic Party, Socialist Party of America
Occupation businessman, publisher

David Courtney Coates (August 9, 1868 – January 17, 1933) was a Pueblo, Colorado businessman,[1] a radical, the 11th Lieutenant Governor of Colorado, secretary of Colorado's State Federation of Labor, and a friend to Big Bill Haywood.

Coates was born in Brandon, Durham, England.[2] In 1901, Lieutenant Governor Coates volunteered, and was dispatched by Colorado Governor James Orman, to be part of a commission sent to Telluride to investigate an uprising of miners from the Western Federation of Miners during a strike. A shooting war was triggered when one of the strikers, believed to have been unarmed, had been shot through the throat by a deputized mine guard. In spite of intense pressure from others, Coates helped to persuade the governor not to send the Colorado National Guard. The commission was able to effect a settlement between the miners and the company, negotiating between union leader Vincent St. John and the Smuggler-Union Mine Company's general manager, Arthur L. Collins.[3]

Coates was present at the founding convention of the Industrial Workers of the World.[4] Coates was offered the presidency of that organization, but declined to accept it.[5] The IWW later abolished the office of the presidency.

In his autobiography, Bill Haywood credited Coates with suggesting a slogan for the IWW: an injury to one is an injury to all.[6] The slogan has since been used by a number of labor organizations.

After leaving office, Coates was a member of the Socialist Party of America. He left the party over its pacifist policies and headed the short-lived National Party during World War I. Coates collapsed and died at his home in North Hollywood, California in 1933.[7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Corpse On Boomerang Road, Telluride's War On Labor 1899-1908, MaryJoy Martin, 2004, page 78.
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ The Corpse On Boomerang Road, Telluride's War On Labor 1899-1908, MaryJoy Martin, 2004, pages 78-79, and 85-87.
  4. ^ Roughneck: The Life and Times of Big Bill Haywood, Peter Carlson, 1983, pp. 78.
  5. ^ Roughneck: The Life and Times of Big Bill Haywood, Peter Carlson, 1983, pp. 84.
  6. ^ William Dudley Haywood,The Autobiography of Big Bill Haywood,1929,pp. 186.
  7. ^ [2]
  8. ^ [3]