David Carlucci

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David Carlucci
Carlucci Headshot.jpg
Portrait of Carlucci
Member of the New York Senate
from the 38th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 1, 2011
Preceded by Thomas Morahan
Personal details
Born (1981-04-03) April 3, 1981 (age 33)
Clarkstown, New York
Political party Democratic
Spouse(s) Lauren Grossberg Carlucci
Residence Clarkstown
Alma mater Rockland Community College
Cornell University
Religion Catholic
Website www.senatorcarlucci.com

David Carlucci (born April 3, 1981) is a member of the New York State Senate representing the 38th district, which includes all of Rockland County and parts of Westchester County. The district formerly included parts of Orange County. He ran as an Independent Democrat and immediately left the Senate Democratic Conference upon taking office.[1]

Early life[edit]

Carlucci was born in Clarkstown, New York on April 3, 1981[2] and raised in Rockland County, graduating from Clarkstown High School North. He graduated from Rockland Community College and Cornell University.[3]

Career[edit]

After graduating from Cornell, Carlucci worked as a financial planner for American Express from 2002 to 2003 and later worked in Congressman Eliot Engel's office as a staff assistant from 2004 to 2005[4] when he was elected as town clerk for the community of Clarkstown.[5] In 2010, during his run for Senate, Carlucci beat out Rockland County Executive C. Scott Vanderhoef by 6 percentage points.[6]

Independent Democratic Conference[edit]

On January 5, 2011, David Carlucci departed from the Senate Democratic Conference and co-formed the Independent Democratic Conference (IDC), with several other Democratic senators.[1] The formation of the IDC enabled Carlucci to be courted by both Democrats and Republicans for support. This break away from the Democratic Conference was seen as a betrayal by the local Democratic party and nearly prevented him from receiving its endorsement for the 2014 senatorial election. At the convention, some Democrats were particularly aggrieved that he did not deliver on his promise of introducing the Equality for Women Act while pushing for legislation contrary to the party's platform.[7] Although Governor Andrew Cuomo had previously supported Carlucci, he later said that all of the Democrats in the IDC would face primaries unless they severed their ties with Senate Republicans. Organized labor also pressured Carlucci, along with the rest of the IDC, to realign himself with the mainline Democrats in the Senate Democratic Conference.[8]

Legislation[edit]

Carlucci sponsored a bill that was signed into law in 2012 that requires all New York State drivers to decide whether to become organ donors on the driver’s license application instead of opting out by default. Lauren’s Law is named for Lauren Shields of Rockland County, who received a heart transplant when she was nine years old.[9] In 2013 Carlucci sponsored a bill that was signed into law called Jobs for Heroes,[10] which gives a tax credit to businesses for hiring returning veterans.[11] Carlucci worked with his colleagues to expand the Elderly Pharmaceutical Insurance Coverage (EPIC), which provides discount drugs for senior citizens. The expansion allows for an increase in number of senior citizens living in New York who will qualify for the program. The expansions passed in early 2014.[12]

In June 2014, Carlucci’s bill to create a relapse prevention program to combat heroin addiction in New York State became a law. The program provides educational legal, financial, social, family, and childcare services, in addition to peer-to-peer support groups, employment support, and transportation assistance, for recovering addicts.[13]

Daily Show[edit]

In the summer of 2011, Carlucci was the subject of "The Daily Show" in a segment entitled "Corn-Hold." This came at a time when the debate of legalizing same-sex marriage was raging. The show made a few jabs at Carlucci who was, at the time, insisting on the importance of having a state vegetable for New York.[14]

Personal life[edit]

Carlucci is married to Lauren Grossberg Carlucci. The two had their first child in 2010. He lives in the Town of Clarkstown, Rockland County.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Carlucci, David. "Statement From Senator Carlucci on the Formation of the Independent Democratic Committee". Senator Carlucci's Website. Senator Carlucci. Retrieved 10 October 2014. 
  2. ^ "Legislative Preview: Meet The New Members". The Capitol. Manhattan Media. January 6, 2011. Retrieved March 13, 2011. 
  3. ^ Incalcaterra, Laura (Jan 18, 2011). "Carlucci and Grossberg wed". The Journal News. Retrieved Oct 4, 2014. 
  4. ^ Jeng, Christina. "At 24, Clarkstown Town Clerk shows passion for office". Clarkstown Town Clerk. Rockland Journal News. Retrieved 10 October 2014. 
  5. ^ a b "David Carlucci: Biography". New York State Senate. Retrieved March 13, 2011. 
  6. ^ Post Staff Report. "2010 Election Results". New York Post Online. New York Post. Retrieved 10 October 2014. 
  7. ^ Incalcaterra, Laura (May 30, 2014). "Carlucci leaves Democratic convention without party's nod". The Journal News. Retrieved Oct 3, 2014. 
  8. ^ Lovett, Ken (Jun 10, 2014). "Union bigs want Sen. David Carlucci to return to Democratic fold while local WFP committeeman urges him to stay the course". New York Daily News. Retrieved Oct 3, 2014. 
  9. ^ Wolfe, Jenna (9 September 2012). "Gov. Cuomo Signs ‘Lauren’s Law’ In Effort To Boost Number Of Organ Donors". NBC. NBC Nightly News. Retrieved 24 October 2014. 
  10. ^ Traum, Robin (4 February 2013). ""Jobs For Heroes" Promotes Veterans’ Employment". Patch.com. Retrieved 24 October 2014. 
  11. ^ Bajza, Stephen (17 February 2013). "Senator Carlucci Proposes "Jobs for Heroes" Legislation". Military.com. Retrieved 24 October 2014. 
  12. ^ Riconda, Michael (4 April 2014). "Expansions to EPIC and STAR aid announced for New York seniors". Rockland County Times. Retrieved 24 October 2014. 
  13. ^ Spector, Joe (28 May 2014). "N.Y. legislators plan heroin crackdown". Poughkeepsie Journal. Retrieved 24 October 2014. 
  14. ^ Campbell, Jon (Jun 24, 2011). "Rockland’s Carlucci bears brunt of Daily Show jab". The Journal News. Retrieved Sep 23, 2014. 

External links[edit]

New York State Senate
Preceded by
Thomas Morahan
New York State Senate, 38th District
2011–present
Incumbent