David Carter (politician)

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The Right Honourable
David Carter
MP
29th Speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives
Incumbent
Assumed office
1 February 2013
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Lockwood Smith
Minister for Senior Citizens
In office
31 August 1998 – 10 December 1999
Prime Minister Jenny Shipley
Preceded by Robyn McDonald
Succeeded by Lianne Dalziel
Minister of Agriculture
In office
19 November 2008 – 14 December 2011
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Jim Anderton
Succeeded by position terminated
Minister for Biosecurity
In office
19 November 2008 – 14 December 2011
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Jim Anderton
Succeeded by position terminated
Minister of Forestry
In office
19 November 2008 – 14 December 2011
Prime Minister John Key
Preceded by Jim Anderton
Succeeded by position terminated
Member of the New Zealand Parliament
for National Party List
Incumbent
Assumed office
1999
Personal details
Born (1952-04-03) 3 April 1952 (age 62)
Christchurch
Nationality New Zealand
Political party National Party
Alma mater Lincoln University
Occupation Farmer

David Cunningham Carter (born 3 April 1952) is a New Zealand politician and current Speaker of the House, having previously been a cabinet minister.

Early life[edit]

Carter attended St Bede's College in Christchurch, and has a Bachelor of Agricultural Science degree from Lincoln University. He has farmed sheep and cattle for over thirty years, and established the first commercial cattle-embryo transplant company in New Zealand in 1974.[1]

Member of Parliament[edit]

Parliament of New Zealand
Years Term Electorate List Party
1994–1996 44th Selwyn National
1996–1999 45th Banks Peninsula 41 National
1999–2002 46th List 21 National
2002–2005 47th List 4 National
2005–2008 48th List 8 National
2008–2011 49th List 9 National
2011 – present 50th List 10 National

Carter was first elected to Parliament in the 1994 by-election in Selwyn, replacing the resigning Ruth Richardson. In the 1996 general election, he contested and won the Banks Peninsula electorate against Labour's Ruth Dyson. In the 1999 election, he was in turn defeated by Dyson, and instead entered Parliament as a list MP. In the 2002 election, he failed to recapture his seat, and so remained a list MP.

Carter has held several ministerial positions in his career. From 1998 until the National Party's defeat in 1999, he served as Minister for Senior Citizens,[2] as well as Associate Minister of Revenue, and Associate Minister for Food, Fibre, Biosecurity and Border Control. At the very end of National's term in office, he was also Associate Minister of Education. In 2008, Carter was initially chosen as the National candidate for the resurrected safe National seat of Selwyn, but opposition to this saw the National candidacy up for grabs again, eventually won by Amy Adams, who ultimately won the seat. Carter pulled out of the race and was given a high list placing instead.[3] After National's election victory, he took the portfolios of Agriculture, Biosecurity and Forestry.[4]

Minister of Agriculture[edit]

In May 2010, Carter issued a ban on kosher slaughter, rejecting the recommendations of his advisers.[5] Carter held shares in a firm which exports meat and prior to instituting the ban he met senior managers of the firm who wanted a ban on kosher slaughter to reduce their competition.[6]

Minister of Primary Industries[edit]

After the 2011 election, Carter was appointed Minister to the newly formed Ministry of Primary Industries. In November 2012, Carter approved the increased squid fishery SQU6T by 140%, despite recommendations from scientists and the Department of Conservation that this would be detrimental to the endangered New Zealand Sea Lion.[7]

Speaker of the House[edit]

On 22 January 2013 The Prime Minister of New Zealand[8] announced that David Carter would be John Key's preference for the position of Speaker of the House in order to replace outgoing Speaker Lockwood Smith. Carter's appointment wasn't without controversy, and the Labour Party questioned whether he actually wanted the job. Labour stated they were never consulted for their opinion on who should replace Lockwood Smith.[9] As the opposition was not consulted about the new speaker as per convention, Trevor Mallard was nominated by Labour and the position was put to a vote on 31 January 2013. Carter was returned with a 62 votes to 52.[10] Consistent with the tradition of newly elected speakers, Carter had to be "dragged to the chair" following the election.[11] The office of Speaker entitles Carter to the title The Right Honourable following a reform of the New Zealand Honours System in 2010.[12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Slade, Maria (3 November 2008). "Business backgrounds in short supply". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 15 February 2010. 
  2. ^ "Appointment of Ministers" (1 September 1998) 131 New Zealand Gazette 3190.
  3. ^ Trevett, Claire (27 February 2008). "National MP Carter steps aside". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 15 February 2010. 
  4. ^ "Key's Government" (Press release). The New Zealand Herald. 17 November 2008. Retrieved 15 February 2010. 
  5. ^ Ben Gedalyahu, Tzvi (30 May 2010). "New Zealand Bans Kosher Slaughtering". Arutz Sheva. Retrieved 21 October 2012. 
  6. ^ Fisher, David (28 November 2010). "MP Carter makes quick u-turn". The New Zealand Herald. Retrieved 21 October 2012. 
  7. ^ Field, Michael (25 November 2012). "Threat to sea lions ignored". Stuff.co.nz. Retrieved 23 January 2013. 
  8. ^ "PM announces changes to Cabinet line-up" (Press release). The Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet (of New Zealand). 22 January 2013. Retrieved 3 February 2013. 
  9. ^ "Labour: Carter wrong man for job". 3 News NZ. January 29, 2013. 
  10. ^ (31 January 2013) 687 NZPD 1
  11. ^ Fairfax NZ News reporters (31 January 2013). "Carter elected Speaker of the House". The Press. Retrieved 31 January 2013. 
  12. ^ "Rules for the Grant, Use and Retention of the Title “The Right Honourable” in New Zealand" (23 September 2010) 124 New Zealand Gazette 3251 at 3285.
  13. ^ "The Right Honourable". Department of the Prime Minister and Cabinet. Retrieved 31 January 2013. 

External links[edit]


New Zealand Parliament
Preceded by
Ruth Richardson
Member of Parliament for Selwyn
1994–1996
In abeyance
Title next held by
Amy Adams
New constituency Member of Parliament for Banks Peninsula
1996–1999
Succeeded by
Ruth Dyson
Political offices
Preceded by
Lockwood Smith
Speaker of the New Zealand House of Representatives
2013 – present
Incumbent
Preceded by
?
Minister for Senior Citizens
1998–1999
Succeeded by
Lianne Dalziel
Preceded by
Jim Anderton
Minister of Agriculture
2008–2011
Ministries merged
Minister for Biosecurity
2008–2011
Minister of Forestry
2008–2011
New title
New Ministry
Minister for Primary Industries
2012–2013
Succeeded by
Nathan Guy
Preceded by
Nick Smith
Minister of Local Government
2012–2013
Succeeded by
Chris Tremain