David E. Orton

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David E. Orton is an American engineering executive.

David E. Orton was born around 1954 and earned a BS in mathematics and economics at Wake Forest University, and a MS in electrical engineering from Duke University. He worked in the graphics and semiconductor industry as an engineer at Bell Laboratories in 1979 to 1983 and then General Electric through December 1988. He joined Silicon Graphics (SGI) in 1990, and was senior vice president of visual computing and advanced systems through 1999.[1] In 1996 SGI bought Cray Research and Orton had to deal with merging the companies overlapping technologies.[2]

Orton joined ATI Technologies as a result of an acquisition of ArtX in April 2000, where he was president and CEO.[3][4] ATI posted losses after the dot-com bubble collapsed, although losses were reduced by June 2001.[5] He was named CEO of ATI in March 2004.[6] Despite ATI's principal location in Markham, Ontario, Canada, Orton spent most of his time in California where he resided.[citation needed]

After the announced merger of Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) with ATI on July 24, 2006, as ATI Technologies became a subsidiary of AMD, Orton became an executive vice-president of AMD, reporting to AMD CEO Hector Ruiz and COO Dirk Meyer. On July 10, 2007, AMD announced the resignation of Orton as executive vice president.[7] One trade journalist rated Orton as the top of the "CEOs that went in 2007".[8]

From 2007 to 2009 he served as CEO of the startup DSM Solutions.[9] In July 15, 2009 Orton became the CEO of Aptina, a privately held image sensor company located in San Jose, California.[1] He left Aptina in September 2012.[10] He served on the board of directors of SuVolta.[9][11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "David Orton Appointed Chief Executive Officer of Aptina". Press release (Aptina). July 15, 2009. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  2. ^ John Markoff (May 7, 1996). "Resolving Conflicts in Supercomputer Deal". The New York Times. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  3. ^ "ATI Technologies Inc. completes acquisition of ArtX, Inc". Press release. April 5, 2000. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  4. ^ "ati Interview with Dave Orton". Hardware Heaven. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  5. ^ Robert M. Frank (June 28, 2001). "Hardware: Chip Maker Trims Loss". The New York Times. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Dave Orton named as ATI’s next CEO: KY Ho to remain as Chairman, and continue to drive ATI’s strategic business relationships". Press release (ATI Technologies). March 31, 2004. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  7. ^ "AMD Announces the Resignation of Dave Orton, former CEO of ATI". Press release (Business Wire). July 10, 2007. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  8. ^ Martin Veitch (December 21, 2007). "The INQUIRER Top 10 CEOs that went in 2007". The Inquirer. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  9. ^ a b "Board of Directors". Corporate web site. SuVolta. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Aptina Appoints Phil Carmack As Chief Executive Officer". Press release (Aptina). May 29, 2013. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 
  11. ^ Lawrence Latif (June 6, 2011). "Planar transistors are given a new lease on life by ex-ATI boss". The Inquirer. Retrieved August 5, 2013. 

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