David Gibbs (American football)

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David Gibbs
Sport(s) Football
Current position
Title Defensive Coordinator
Team Texas Tech
Conference Big 12
Biographical details
Born (1968-01-10) January 10, 1968 (age 47)
Mount Airy, North Carolina
Alma mater Colorado
Playing career
1987–1990 Colorado
Position(s) Defensive Back
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1991–1992
1993–1994
1995–1996
1997–2000
2001
2002–2004
2005
2006–2008
2009–2010
2012
2013–2014
2014
2015–present
Oklahoma (GA)
Colorado (GA)
Kansas (DB)
Minnesota (DC)
Denver Broncos (S)
Denver Broncos (DB)
Auburn (DC)
Kansas City Chiefs (DB)
Houston Texans (DB)
Virginia Destroyers (DB)
Houston (DC)
Houston (Interim HC)
Texas Tech (Co-DC)
Head coaching record
Overall 1–0 (1.000)
Bowls 1–0

David Alexander Gibbs (born January 10, 1968) is an American football coach and former player. He is currently the defensive coordinator for Texas Tech University, a position he has held since January 2015. Gibbs previously served in a similar capacity at the University of Minnesota, Auburn University, and the University of Houston, as well as an assistant coach in the National Football League (NFL) for the Denver Broncos, Kansas City Chiefs and Houston Texans.

Playing career[edit]

Gibbs began his playing career at Auburn High School, in Auburn, Alabama, while his father was offensive coordinator at nearby Auburn University. Gibbs went on to attend the University of Colorado, where he was a four-year letterman at defensive back from 1986 through 1990. He was named to the Academic All-Big Eight team as a senior, leading the Buffaloes to the 1990 national championship under coach Bill McCartney.

Coaching career[edit]

After graduating from Colorado, Gibbs served as a graduate assistant at the University of Oklahoma and at Colorado. In 1995, he became the secondary coach at the University of Kansas under head coach Glen Mason. When Mason was appointed head coach at the University of Minnesota in 1997, Gibbs was hired as the Golden Gophers' defensive coordinator, the youngest coordinator in Division I-A at that time.[1] Gibbs improved a Minnesota defense that had ranked last in the Big Ten in 1996 to one that was ranked eighth in the nation in pass and scoring defense by 1999.

From 2001 through 2004, Gibbs coached defense for the Denver Broncos, which by 2003 was rated the fourth strongest defense in the NFL. In 2005, he returned to Auburn to be defensive coordinator for Auburn University, where his defense ranked sixth in the NCAA in scoring defense and led the Southeastern Conference (SEC) in sacks.[1] Gibbs became defensive backs coach for the Kansas City Chiefs in 2006.

Gibbs was hired as defensive backs coach by the Houston Texans in January 2009.[2] Following the 2010 season, the Texans fired him along with defensive coordinator Frank Bush. After a one-year hiatus from coaching, he spent 2012 coaching defensive backs for the Virginia Destroyers of the United Football League (UFL).

Gibbs accepted the position of defensive coordinator at the University of Houston on January 15, 2013. He resigned that position on January 5, 2015 after coaching the biggest winning fourth quarter comeback in bowl history at the 2015 Armed Forces Bowl with the score of 35–34. On January 5, 2015 Gibbs was hired for the same position at Texas Tech.[3] He is Texas Tech's sixth defensive coordinator since 2009.

Personal[edit]

Gibbs is the son of Alex Gibbs, a longtime NFL assistant coach.

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
Houston Cougars (American Athletic Conference) (2014)
2014 Houston 1–0[note 1] 0–0[note 1] T–4th W Armed Forces
Houston: 1–0 0–0
Total: 1–0
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Gibbs coached the 2015 Armed Forces Bowl after head coach Tony Levine was fired after a 7–5 (5–3 The American) regular season.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Feldman, Bruce (January 14, 2013). "Gibbs back to college as Houston DC". CBS Sports Network. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  2. ^ Associated Press (January 20, 2009). "Texans hire David Gibbs as secondary coach". Sporting News. Retrieved 9 June 2013. 
  3. ^ ESPN news services (January 5, 2015). "Texas Tech Red Raiders hire David Gibbs". ESPN. Retrieved 6 January 2015. 

External links[edit]