David Grant Colson

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For the American television writer, actor, and director, see David Colson (television).
David Grant Colson
A man with black hair wearing a black jacket and vest, patterned bowtie and white shirt and pocket square
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 11th district
In office
March 4, 1895 – March 3, 1899
Preceded by Silas Adams
Succeeded by Vincent Boreing
Personal details
Born (1861-04-01)April 1, 1861
Middlesboro, Kentucky
Died September 27, 1904(1904-09-27) (aged 43)
Middlesboro, Kentucky
Resting place Colson Cemetery
Political party Republican
Alma mater University of Kentucky
Profession Lawyer
Military service
Allegiance United States of America
Service/branch Kentucky volunteers
Rank Colonel
Battles/wars Spanish–American War

David Grant Colson (April 1, 1861 – September 27, 1904) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

Biography[edit]

Born in Yellow Creek (now Middlesboro, Kentucky), Knox (now Bell) County, Kentucky, Colson attended the common schools and the academies at Tazewell and Mossy Creek, Tennessee. He studied law at the University of Kentucky at Lexington in 1879 and 1880. He was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Pineville. Examiner and special examiner in the Pension Bureau of the United States Department of the Interior, Washington, D.C., from September 1882 to June 1886. He returned to Kentucky in 1887. He served as member of the State house of representatives in 1887 and 1888. He served as mayor of Middlesboro 1893-1895.

Colson was elected as a Republican to the Fifty-fourth and Fifty-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1895-March 3, 1899). He served as chairman of the Committee on Expenditures on Public Buildings (Fifty-fifth Congress).

He served as colonel of a Kentucky regiment during the Spanish-American War. In a feud with a fellow officer after mustering out after the war, he killed three men in a pistol fight in Frankfort, Kentucky on January 16, 1900.

He died in Middlesboro, Kentucky, September 27, 1904. He was interred in Colson Cemetery.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.