David Haig (biologist)

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David Addison Haig (born 28 June 1958) is an Australian evolutionary biologist and geneticist, professor in Harvard Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology. He is interested in intragenomic conflict, genomic imprinting and parent-offspring conflict, and wrote the book Genomic Imprinting and Kinship. His major contribution to the field of evolutionary theory is the kinship theory of genomic imprinting.

Significant papers[edit]

  • Haig, D. (1993). Genetic conflicts in human pregnancy. Quarterly Review of Biology, 68, 495-532.
  • Haig, D. (1997) The social gene. In Krebs, J. R. & Davies, N. B. (editors) Behavioural Ecology: an Evolutionary Approach, pp. 284-304. Blackwell Publishers, London.
  • Haig, D. (2000) The kinship theory of genomic imprinting. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, 31, 9-32.
  • Wilkins, J. F. & Haig, D. (2003) What good is genomic imprinting: the function of parent-specific gene expression. Nature Reviews Genetics, 4, 359-368.
  • Haig, D. (2004) Genomic imprinting and kinship: how good is the evidence? Annual Review of Genetics, 38, 553-585.

Books[edit]

  • Haig, D. (2002) Genomic Imprinting and Kinship. Rutgers University Press, Piscataway, NJ. ISBN 0-8135-3027-X

External links[edit]