David Hajdu

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David Hajdu
10.11.14DavidHajduByLuigiNovi1.jpg
Hajdu at the New York Comic Con
Born Phillipsburg, New Jersey, US
Occupation Professor, music critic, writer
Nationality US
Period 1965–present
Notable works Lush Life
Positively 4th Street
The Ten-Cent Plague
Spouse Karen Oberlin
Children 3
Website
www.davidhajdu.com

David Hajdu is an American columnist, author and professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He is the music critic for The New Republic.[1]

Early life[edit]

Hajdu was born and raised in Phillipsburg, New Jersey and attended New York University, where he majored in journalism.[2]

His first professional work was illustrating for The Easton Express in 1972.[3] He started writing for The Village Voice and Rolling Stone in 1979, and was the founding editor of Video Review magazine, where he worked from 1980 to 1984.[3] In the late 1980s began teaching at The New School, and was an editor at Entertainment Weekly from 1990 to 1999.[3] He has taught at the University of Chicago (as nonfiction writer in residence), Syracuse University, and Columbia University,[3] where he is an associate professor of journalism.[1]

His biographical work includes Lush Life: A Biography of Billy Strayhorn,[4] and Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Farina and Richard Farina. His nonfiction work includes The Ten-Cent Plague: The Great Comic-Book Scare and How It Changed America,[5] and Heroes and Villains: Essays on Music, Movies, Comics, and Culture.

Awards[edit]

  • 1997 ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award: Lush Life: A Biography of Billy Strayhorn[6]
  • 2002 ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award: Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Farina and Richard Farina[6]
  • Finalist, National Book Critics Circle Award: Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Farina and Richard Farina[7]
  • Finalist, Firecracker Book Award: Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Farina and Richard Farina[7]
  • 2002 ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award: Heroes and Villains: Essays on Music, Movies, Comics, and Culture[6]

Personal life[edit]

Hajdu has three children, Jacob, Victoria, and Nathan, and lives in Manhattan with his wife, singer and actress Karen Oberlin.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Faculty: David Hajdu". Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  2. ^ Bell, Bill (April 30, 1999). "Long Live the Duke". Daily News (New York City). Retrieved March 14, 2011. He was born in Phillipsburg, N.J., where his father was a mill worker and his mother a waitress. He majored in journalism at New York University, and except for a brief flirtation with the Episcopal priesthood as a seminarian at the New York General Theological Seminary, he has worked as a writer and editor for about 25 years. 
  3. ^ a b c d "About". David Hajdu (official site). Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Silent Partner". The New York Times. July 14, 1996. Retrieved June 26, 2008. 
  5. ^ Minzesheimer, Bob (March 19, 2008). "'Ten-Cent Plague': Comic books and censorship". USA Today. Retrieved June 26, 2008. 
  6. ^ a b c "Prof. David Hajdu wins Deems Taylor Award for music criticism". Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. November 17, 2010. Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b "Critics Announce Book Award Finalists". The New York Times. January 29, 2002. Retrieved June 26, 2008. 

External links[edit]