David Hajdu

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David Hajdu
Born Phillipsburg, New Jersey, US
Occupation Professor, music critic, writer
Nationality US
Period 1965–present
Notable works Lush Life
Positively 4th Street
The Ten-Cent Plague
Spouse Karen Oberlin
Children 3

www.davidhajdu.com

David Hajdu is an American columnist, author and professor at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. He is the music critic for The New Republic.[1]

Hajdu was born and raised in Phillipsburg, New Jersey and attended New York University, where he majored in journalism.[2]

His first professional work was illustrating for The Easton Express in 1972.[3] He started writing for The Village Voice and Rolling Stone in 1979, and was the founding editor of Video Review magazine, where he worked from 1980 to 1984.[3] In the late 1980s began teaching at The New School, and was an editor at Entertainment Weekly from 1990 to 1999.[3] He has taught at the University of Chicago (as nonfiction writer in residence), Syracuse University, and Columbia University,[3] where he is an associate professor of journalism.[1]

His biographical work includes Lush Life: A Biography of Billy Strayhorn,[4] and Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Farina and Richard Farina. His nonfiction work includes The Ten-Cent Plague: The Great Comic-Book Scare and How It Changed America,[5] and Heroes and Villains: Essays on Music, Movies, Comics, and Culture.

Awards[edit]

  • 1997 ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award: Lush Life: A Biography of Billy Strayhorn[6]
  • 2002 ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award: Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Farina and Richard Farina[6]
  • Finalist, National Book Critics Circle Award: Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Farina and Richard Farina[7]
  • Finalist, Firecracker Book Award: Positively 4th Street: The Lives and Times of Joan Baez, Bob Dylan, Mimi Baez Farina and Richard Farina[7]
  • 2002 ASCAP-Deems Taylor Award: Heroes and Villains: Essays on Music, Movies, Comics, and Culture[6]

Personal life[edit]

Hajdu has three children, Jacob, Victoria, and Nathan, and lives in Manhattan with his wife, singer and actress Karen Oberlin.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Faculty: David Hajdu". Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  2. ^ Bell, Bill (April 30, 1999). "Long Live the Duke". Daily News (New York City). Retrieved March 14, 2011. "He was born in Phillipsburg, N.J., where his father was a mill worker and his mother a waitress. He majored in journalism at New York University, and except for a brief flirtation with the Episcopal priesthood as a seminarian at the New York General Theological Seminary, he has worked as a writer and editor for about 25 years." 
  3. ^ a b c d "About". David Hajdu (official site). Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  4. ^ "Silent Partner". The New York Times. July 14, 1996. Retrieved June 26, 2008. 
  5. ^ Minzesheimer, Bob (March 19, 2008). "'Ten-Cent Plague': Comic books and censorship". USA Today. Retrieved June 26, 2008. 
  6. ^ a b c "Prof. David Hajdu wins Deems Taylor Award for music criticism". Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. November 17, 2010. Retrieved December 20, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b "Critics Announce Book Award Finalists". The New York Times. January 29, 2002. Retrieved June 26, 2008. 

External links[edit]