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David Hattner

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David Hattner
Born Toledo, Ohio
Occupation Clarinetist, conductor
Known for Conductor and music director of the Portland Youth Philharmonic

David Hattner is an American professional clarinetist and conductor currently serving as music director of the Portland Youth Philharmonic. Raised in Toledo, Ohio, Hattner attended the Interlochen Arts Camp and Arts Academy, experiences he claims inspired him to become a professional musician and conductor. He graduated from the Arts Academy in 1986 and enrolled in Northwestern University where he studied clarinet performance under Robert Marcellus. In 1988 he placed second in the International Clarinet Association's Young Artist Competition and was selected to join the American-Soviet Youth Orchestra. He earned a music degree with honors in 1990.

After performing clarinet with and guest conducting several major ensembles, Hattner moved to New York City in 1996 and became principal clarinetist of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra; his Lincoln Center debut occurred later that year. By 2002 Hattner was the music director and clarinetist of Camerata Atlantica. In 2008 he was chosen to be the conductor and music director of the Portland Youth Philharmonic. Since joining the Philharmonic he has debuted with the Oregon Symphony, Oregon Mozart Players and continues to perform clarinet for local ensembles and other projects. Hattner has also participated in multimedia work with silent film both nationally and internationally.

Education and career[edit]

David Hattner was born to Louis and Joan Hattner, residents of Toledo, Ohio.[1][2] His father was not a musician but owned an extensive record collection which included classical music; this influenced him at an early age.[3] Prior to college, Hattner attended the Interlochen Arts Camp in 1980 and from 1982–1984.[4][5] He then spent three years at the Interlochen Arts Academy where he studied with Richard MacDowell and Frank Kowalsky, graduating in 1986.[6] He has stated that his experiences at Interlochen inspired him to become a professional musician and conductor.[4] In the summer of 1987, following his freshman year at Northwestern University where he studied clarinet performance under Robert Marcellus, Hattner was selected to perform at the Spoleto Music Festival in Italy.[1][7] In 1988 he placed second in the International Clarinet Association's Young Artist Competition and was selected to be a member of the American-Soviet Youth Orchestra.[2][8] Hattner earned a music degree with honors from Northwestern.[7] Following his graduation in 1990, Hattner returned to Toledo and presented a clarinet recital at the University of Toledo's Center for the Performing Arts.[9]

In 1996 Hattner moved to New York City and became principal clarinetist of the Princeton Symphony Orchestra.[6][10] His Lincoln Center debut took place at Alice Tully Hall in November 1996 with the American premiere of Isang Yun's Quintet No. 2 for Clarinet and Strings.[6] He also performed with the Garden State Philharmonic, Long Island Philharmonic, New Jersey Symphony Orchestra, Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, and the Quintet of the Americas. Hattner guest conducted the Oklahoma Chamber Ensemble and Garden State Philharmonic and organized benefit concerts at St. Ignatius of Antioch Church in Manhattan to feed local residents. In 2001 he released The Clarinetist Composer with Albert Tiu.[11][12] By 2002 Hattner was the music director and clarinetist of Camerata Atlantica, an ensemble he co-founded with Mark Sloss.[11][13][14]

Hattner participated in the American Academy of Conducting at the Aspen Music Festival three times (2003, 2005 and 2006);[15] there he studied with Murry Sidlin and David Zinman, former conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra.[11] In February 2006 he conducted Richard Einhorn's Voices of Light as the score to Carl Theodor Dreyer's 1928 silent film The Passion of Joan of Arc at the Winter Garden Atrium in Manhattan as part of the World Financial Center's Arts + Events series.[16][17] Hattner has also guest conducted the Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra,[18] Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra, Ensemble Sospeso, Eugene Symphony,[19] International Contemporary Ensemble, and the Massapequa Philharmonic Orchestra.[7][11][20] He has been the principal clarinet with the Cascade Music Festival Orchestra in Bend for two seasons,[21] the Key West Symphony Orchestra, and the New Jersey Opera Theater.[7] In 2010 he became a member of Interlochen's Heritage Society, reserved for people who have chosen to contribute to Interlochen through estate-planning.[4] In May 2010 he served as conductor of the Interlochen Philharmonic during the first two weeks of Interlochen Arts Camp.[4] Hattner made his Oregon Symphony debut in January 2011.[22] He guest conducted the Oregon Mozart Players, an ensemble based in Eugene, in October 2011 as one of three finalists to fill the position of departing music director Glen Cortese.[21][23] Hattner guest conducted the Oregon State University Wind Ensemble and FearNoMusic in October 2011,[24][25] followed by the University of Oregon Symphony in November 2011.[26] In April 2012 Hattner conducted and performed clarinet for Promise, an opera by Theresa Koon about the life of Camille Claudel.[27][28]

Portland Youth Philharmonic[edit]

Hattner conducting the orchestra at Pioneer Courthouse Square in 2014

In 2008 Hattner was chosen from a field of 112 candidates to be the conductor and music director of the Portland Youth Philharmonic.[7][19] In April 2010 the Philharmonic was awarded the Oregon Symphony's Patty Vemer Excellence in Music Education Award, marking the first time the recognition for inspiring students was presented to an organization. Hattner accepted the award on the orchestra's behalf.[29] In order to make use of all musicians in the Philharmonic as often as possible, Hattner often programs Romantic music and symphonies and ballets from the early 20th century.[30] The Philharmonic began offering chamber orchestra concerts during his tenure.[30][31][32]

Style and interests[edit]

Hattner has said of his conducting style, "It is generally somewhat of a collaborative process between myself and the musicians, having been a player myself. I'm fairly specific about what I'm asking for in terms of the tempos and the phrasing, but bits of individual expression comes from the hearts and minds of the players themselves. I don't try to micromanage every detail."[21] In addition to conducting and clarinet performance, Hattner has participated in multimedia work with silent film both nationally and internationally.[7][16] He continues to perform clarinet in ensembles such as 45th Parallel,[33] Martingale Ensemble and other projects.[34][35]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "8 Events Planned for TU's Annual Spring Festival". The Blade (Toledo, Ohio: Block Communications). May 21, 1987. p. 16. Retrieved March 10, 2012. 
  2. ^ a b "National organ recitalist to play at Trinity Episcopal". The Blade (Toledo, Ohio: Block Communications). April 21, 1988. p. 19. Retrieved March 10, 2012. 
  3. ^ "Music for the Soul". January 16, 2009. Event occurs at 8:24–13:02, 24:48–30:25, 44:24–46:54. Oregon Public Broadcasting. Retrieved March 10, 2012.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  4. ^ a b c d "Camp and Academy Alumnus Gives Back to Interlochen". Interlochen Center for the Arts. May 17, 2010. Retrieved March 9, 2012. 
  5. ^ Bash, James (August 13, 2012). "Bartok, Wagner, Theofanidis, and more. David Hattner talks about the upcoming PYP season". Oregon Music News. Retrieved August 14, 2012. 
  6. ^ a b c "Performer Biographies: The Clarinetist Composer". Northbranch Records. Retrieved March 9, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f "Portland Youth Philharmonic chooses David Hattner as new conductor". The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon: Advance Publications). April 1, 2008. ISSN 8750-1317. Retrieved November 29, 2010. 
  8. ^ "ICA Competition Winners". International Clarinet Association. Retrieved March 9, 2012. 
  9. ^ "New of music: Music under the Stars slates John Williams' compositions". The Blade (Toledo, Ohio: Block Communications). July 19, 1990. p. P-2. Retrieved March 10, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Hot News, April 2007: Eastern Conservatory 4th Annual New Jersey Clarinet Symposium with Pascual Martinez Forteza – NY Philharmonic". Weltweite Klarinetten Allianz (World Clarinet Alliance). April 28, 2007. Retrieved March 26, 2012. 
  11. ^ a b c d "Philharmonic Concert March 18". Massapequan Observer (Massapequa, New York). March 3, 2006. Retrieved March 10, 2012. 
  12. ^ "The Clarinetist Composer". Northbranch Records. Retrieved March 10, 2012. 
  13. ^ "Meet the Judges". Sinfonietta Nova. Retrieved March 10, 2012. 
  14. ^ "Clarinet Symposium Agenda" (PDF). Flemington, New Jersey: County of Hunterdon. 2006. Retrieved March 10, 2012. 
  15. ^ Stabler, David (January 4, 2008). "Youth orchestra candidates no slouches". The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon: Advance Publications). ISSN 8750-1317. Retrieved March 11, 2012. 
  16. ^ a b Tommasini, Anthony (February 18, 2006). "Joan's Passion on the Screen, Plus Chorus and Orchestra". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). ISSN 0362-4331. OCLC 1645522. Retrieved May 21, 2011. 
  17. ^ ""Voice of Light" Live". New York City: WNYC. February 10, 2008. Retrieved March 10, 2012.  Note: Episode #2518.
  18. ^ "Recordings of the Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra". Brooklyn Symphony Orchestra (Brooklyn Heights Music Society). Retrieved March 26, 2012. 
  19. ^ a b Stabler, David (November 10, 2008). "Portland Youth Philharmonic opens 85th season". The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon: Advance Publications). ISSN 8750-1317. Retrieved May 21, 2011. 
  20. ^ Delatiner, Barbara (January 30, 2005). "The Guide". The New York Times (The New York Times Company). ISSN 0362-4331. OCLC 1645522. Retrieved May 21, 2011. 
  21. ^ a b c Keefer, Bob (October 6, 2011). "Maestro candidates on podium this season". The Register-Guard (Eugene, Oregon: Guard Publishing). p. D1. Retrieved March 9, 2012. 
  22. ^ "Guest Artist Bio: David Hattner". Oregon Symphony. Retrieved May 21, 2011. 
  23. ^ Farnworth, John (October 10, 2011). "Mozart Players' conductor search opens on strong note". The Register-Guard (Eugene, Oregon: Guard Publishing). p. D4. Retrieved March 9, 2012. 
  24. ^ Payne, Sarah (November 3, 2011). "Similar instruments, two different sounds". Albany Democrat-Herald (Albany, Oregon: Lee Enterprises). 
  25. ^ "Past Concert: A Piano Riot!". FearNoMusic. 2011. Retrieved May 2, 2012. 
  26. ^ "University Symphony: David Hattner, Guest Conductor" (PDF). University of Oregon School of Music and Dance. November 2011. Retrieved March 9, 2012. 
  27. ^ Bash, James (April 2, 2012). "Theresa Koon talks about her opera, Promise, and the life of Camille Claudel". Oregon Music News. Retrieved April 13, 2012. 
  28. ^ Stabler, David (April 11, 2012). "'Promise,' an opera about troubled Rodin model Camille Claudel, explores art and madness". The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon: Advance Publications). ISSN 8750-1317. Retrieved April 13, 2012. 
  29. ^ Stabler, David (April 15, 2010). "Portland Youth Philharmonic wins the Oregon Symphony's music education award". The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon: Advance Publications). ISSN 8750-1317. Retrieved March 9, 2012. 
  30. ^ a b Bash, James (August 23, 2010). "David Hattner keeps raising the bar with Portland Youth Philharmonic". Oregon Music News. Retrieved March 9, 2012. 
  31. ^ Hottle, Molly (April 28, 2011). "Northwest Portland: Portland Youth Philharmonic to bring chamber orchestra to Wieden + Kennedy building". The Oregonian (Portland, Oregon: Advance Publications). ISSN 8750-1317. Retrieved May 21, 2011. 
  32. ^ Bash, James (August 22, 2011). "David Hattner talks about the upcoming Portland Youth Philharmonic season and music education". Oregon Music News. Retrieved March 9, 2012. 
  33. ^ "Featured Artists". 45th Parallel. Retrieved March 10, 2012. 
  34. ^ Sources for Martingale Ensemble:
  35. ^ Sources for other projects:

External links[edit]