David Hollinger

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David Albert Hollinger (born 1941) is the Preston Hotchkis Professor of History emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley. His specialty is in American intellectual history. He is the author of six books, including Postethnic America: Beyond Multiculturalism (3rd edition, expanded, 2006) and After Cloven Tongues of Fire: Protestant Liberalism and Modern American History (2013). Among his several edited or co-edited volumes is his source book, The American Intellectual Tradition, co-edited with Charles Capper. This is among the most widely used textbooks in college undergraduate courses focusing on American intellectual history since the Civil War.

Hollinger earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from La Verne College in 1963, his Master of Arts degree in 1965 and his Ph.D. in 1970, both from UC Berkeley. He has previously taught at the University at Buffalo and the University of Michigan, and was the Harmsworth Professor of American History at Oxford University from 2001 to 2002. He taught at Berkeley from 1992 to 2013, during which time he served as a PHD advisor to many people who have since become well established as publishing scholars in history, including S. M. Amadae, Jennifer Burns, Ruben Flores, K. Healan Gaston, Daniel Geary, Nils Gilman, Daniel Immerwahr, Andrew Jewett, Susan Nance, Molly Oshatz, Kevin Schultz, and Jonathan Spiro.

Hollinger served as president of the Organization of American Historians in 2010-11. He is an elected fellow of The American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has served as a trustee of the National Humanities Center and of The Institute For Advanced Study. His Influence on the study of American religious history was noted in a New York Times article from July 23, 2013, "A Religious Legacy, With Its Leftward Tilt, Is Reconsidered".

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