David Horvitz

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David Horvitz
Birth name David Horvitz
Born 1972,[1] 1981[2] or 1982[3]
Los Angeles, California, USA
Nationality American
Field Mail art, photography
Training Milton Avery Graduate School of the Arts at Bard College, University of California Riverside

David Horvitz is a Fluxus-inspired artist,[citation needed] based in Brooklyn, New York, who uses a variety of media including art books, photography, performance art, and mail art. He has gained notability, in part because of his use of Wikipedia as a site for information exchange; this work includes "A Wikipedia Reader," a mind map of artists browsing of Wikipedia, and "Public Access," photos of beaches uploaded to Wikipedia.

Career

Horvitz uses art books, photography, performance art, watercolor, and mail art to create his work.[2][4] His work includes "A Wikipedia Reader," a mind map of artists browsing of Wikipedia, and "Public Access," photographs of beaches uploaded to Wikipedia. His published work includes: Xiu Xiu: The Polaroid Project (2007), Everything that can happen in a day (2010), and Sad, Depressed, People (2012). He has exhibited at SF Camerawork, the Museum of Modern Art, the New Museum, Tate Modern[5][6][7][8]

In 2009 Horvitz released the artist book Rarely Seen Bas Jan Ader Film,[9] with Los Angeles based publisher 2nd Cannons Publications. A few years prior Horvitz re-discovered a 1975 film by Bas Jan Ader, at the University of California at Irvine.[10]

In 2009, David Horvitz started the “Heads in Freezers” meme. Participants took photos of their heads in freezers, tagged them with “241543903” and uploaded them to social media sites like Tumblr.[11][12]

Wikipedia controversy and subsequent art project

In 2011, David Horvitz uploaded photographs he took of beach scenes to Wikipedia. These produced “a flurry of discussion amongst the Wikipedia community”. Many of the photos were deleted or cropped as possibly being self promotional.[13] The Wikipedia response to David's photograph uploads then became the art project Public Access which was displayed at SF Camerawork in San Francisco. The graphic designer Eric Nylund and Ed Steck produced a pdf of the project.[14]

References

External links