David Lidington

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The Right Honourable
David Lidington
MP
David Lidington (4606350522).jpg
Minister of State for Europe
Incumbent
Assumed office
11 May 2010
Prime Minister David Cameron
Preceded by Chris Bryant
Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
In office
10 November 2003 – 2 July 2007
Leader Michael Howard
David Cameron
Preceded by Quentin Davies
Succeeded by Owen Paterson
Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
In office
23 July 2002 – 6 November 2003
Leader Iain Duncan Smith
Preceded by Peter Ainsworth
Succeeded by Theresa May
Member of Parliament
for Aylesbury
Incumbent
Assumed office
9 April 1992
Preceded by Timothy Raison
Majority 12,618 (23.7%)
Personal details
Born David Roy Lidington
(1956-06-30) 30 June 1956 (age 58)
London, England
Political party Conservative
Children 4
Alma mater Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge
Website Official website

David Roy Lidington PC (born 30 June 1956) is a British Conservative Party politician, who has been Member of Parliament for Aylesbury since 1992. He is currently a Minister of State at the Foreign Office, serving as Minister for Europe.[1] This responsibility includes the overseas territories of Gibraltar and Akrotiri and Dhekelia.

Personal life[edit]

Lidington was educated at the then direct grant Haberdashers' Aske's Boys' School in Elstree and at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge; he took an honours degree in History and a PhD in 1988 entitled "The enforcement of the penal statutes at the court of the Exchequer c.1558-c.1576" on Elizabethan history. His passion for history is shared by his brother, Peter "Lidders" Lidington, who is a history teacher at Clifton College in Bristol. Whilst at Cambridge, he was Chairman of Cambridge University Conservative Association and Deputy President of the Cambridge University Students' Union.

His early jobs involved work for BP and Rio Tinto Group before being appointed in 1987 as special adviser to the then Home Secretary Douglas Hurd. He moved to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office in 1989 when Mr Hurd was appointed Foreign Secretary.

Lidington is married with four children. He was brought up as a Congregationalist but now worships at the Church of England. He was the Captain of the Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge team that won the 1978 series of University Challenge. The team returned for the 2002 University Challenge - Reunited "champion of champions" series for the show's 40th anniversary, and they won the series in convincing style, beating Keele University in the final 375-185.

Political career[edit]

In the 1987 general election, he stood unsuccessfully in the Vauxhall constituency. He was then selected as the Conservative candidate for the safe seat of Aylesbury in December 1990. He was successful at the 1992 general election, and held his seat ever since.

At Westminster, he previously participated in the Education Select Committee and Conservative Backbench Home Affairs Committee.

In 1994, he successfully promoted a Private Members Bill which became the Chiropractors Act 1994.

Lidington first joined the Conservative front bench team in August 1994, when he became Parliamentary Private Secretary to Home Secretary Michael Howard. In June 1997, with the Conservatives in opposition, he became Parliamentary Private Secretary to Leader of the Opposition William Hague. Two years later, in June 1999, he was promoted to become Shadow Home Affairs Minister (deputy to Ann Widdecombe). In September 2001, Lidington was promoted to become Shadow Financial Secretary to the Treasury.

Lidington became a member of the Shadow Cabinet in May 2002, replacing Ann Winterton as Shadow Minister of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (later Shadow Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs) after she resigned. When Michael Howard was elected Conservative Party leader in November 2003, Lidington became Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, but was not included as a member of the Shadow Cabinet. In May 2005, Howard enlarged the Shadow Cabinet, granting Lidington the right to attend it again. He was one of the few Shadow Cabinet ministers left in his old post by David Cameron when the latter became leader in December 2005. But on 2 July 2007, Lidington was demoted to be a junior Foreign Affairs spokesman.

Following the 2010 general election, Lidington was appointed Minister for Europe.

Expenses[edit]

In May 2009, the Daily Telegraph revealed Lidington had claimed nearly £1,300 for his dry cleaning and had also claimed for toothpaste, shower gel, body spray and vitamin supplements on his second home allowance.[2] Lidington decided to repay the claims for the toiletries, saying “I accept that many people would see them as over-generous."

Lidington was also criticised by local newspaper the Bucks Herald for claiming £115,891 in expenses in one year, almost double his salary.[3]

HS2[edit]

In November 2013 Lidington was criticised in an editorial of the local newspaper the Bucks Herald for his repeated failure to vote against the HS2 rail project which is set to affect large areas of his constituency.[4]

References[edit]

External links[edit]


Parliament of the United Kingdom
Preceded by
Timothy Raison
Member of Parliament for Aylesbury
1992–present
Incumbent
Political offices
Preceded by
Quentin Davies
Shadow Secretary of State for Northern Ireland
2003–2007
Succeeded by
Owen Paterson