David Nainkin

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David Nainkin
Country South Africa South Africa
Residence United States
Born 20 September 1970
South Africa
Height 6' (183 cm)
Turned pro 1992
Plays Right-handed
Prize money $501,132
Singles
Career record 27-45
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 132 (8 Jan 1999)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open 1R (1994, 1996)
Wimbledon 2R (1998)
US Open 3R (1998)
Doubles
Career record 8-20
Career titles 0
Highest ranking No. 138 (28 Feb 1994)
Grand Slam Doubles results
US Open 1R (1994)

David Nainkin (born 20 September 1970) is a former professional tennis player from South Africa.[1]

Career[edit]

Nainkin never reached a final on the ATP Tour but made it into the semi finals of the 1995 Nokia Open in Beijing, before losing to Michael Chang.[2]

He had the best win of his Grand Slam career at the 1996 US Open when he upset countryman and number nine seed Wayne Ferreira 6-4, 6-4, 2-6, 7-5 in the opening round. This was despite Nainkin being ranked 215 in the world and having never previously won a Gram Slam match in five attempts.[3] He lost in straight sets to Jonas Björkman in the second round. In the 1998 US Open he made it into the third round, his best ever showing, with wins over fellow qualifier Mark Merklein (6-7, 6-0, 6-4, 6-4 ) and French Open winner Gustavo Kuerten (2-6, 6-4, 6-3, 6-4). He was then eliminated by eventual champion Patrick Rafter 6-1, 6-1, 6-1.

The South African represented his country at the 1998 and 1999 Davis Cups.[4]

He now works for the United States Tennis Association and coaches top American players such as Mardy Fish, Sam Querrey and Sloane Stephens. Previously, he had been the personal coach of Wayne Ferreira.[5]

Challenger titles[edit]

Singles: (1)[edit]

No. Year Tournament Surface Opponent in the final Score in the final
1. 1994 South Korea Seoul, South Korea Hard United States Michael Joyce 6–7, 6–3, 7–5

Doubles: (4)[edit]

No. Year Tournament Surface Partner Opponents in the final Score in the final
1. 1989 South Africa Johannesburg, South Africa Grass South Africa Lan Bale United Kingdom Neil Broad
South Africa Stefan Kruger
4–6, 6–4, 6–2
2. 1992 Australia Perth Australia Hard South Africa Lan Bale Australia Andrew Florent
Australia Andrew McLean
3–6, 7–6, 7–5
3. 1993 Italy Rome, Italy Clay South Africa Grant Stafford Brazil Danilo Marcelino
Brazil Fernando Meligeni
6–0, 6–1
4. 1993 Indonesia Jakarta, Indonesia Hard South Africa Lan Bale Germany Mathias Huning
Malaysia Adam Malik
6–7, 7–6, 7–6

References[edit]