David Niven on screen, stage, radio, record and in print

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Niven in the 1948 film Enchantment

The British actor David Niven (1910–1983) performed in many genres of light entertainment, including film, radio and theatre. He was also the author of four books: two works of fiction and two auto-biographies. Described by Brian McFarlane, writing for the British Film Institute (BFI), as being "of famously debonair manner",[1] Niven's career spanned from 1932 until 1983.

After brief spells as an army officer, whisky salesman and with a horse racing syndicate,[2] he was an uncredited extra in his screen debut in There Goes the Bride; he went on to appear in nearly a hundred films, the last of which was in 1983: Curse of the Pink Panther. During his long film career, he was presented with a Golden Globe Award for his part in The Moon Is Blue (1953) and was nominated for a BAFTA for the titular lead in Carrington V.C. (1955). For his role as Major Pollock in the 1958 film Separate Tables, Niven was awarded the Academy and Golden Globe awards for a performance where "the pain behind the fake polish was moving to observe".[1] According to Sheridan Morley, Niven's other notable works include The Charge of the Light Brigade (1938), The Way Ahead (1944), A Matter of Life and Death (1946)—judged by the BFI to be one of the top twenty British films of all time[3]The Guns of Navarone (1961) and the role of Sir Charles Litton in three Pink Panther films.[2]

Niven lived much of his life in the United States, although upon the outbreak of the Second World War, he returned to Britain to fight, and was re-commissioned as a lieutenant in the Highland Light Infantry.[2] At the end of the war he returned to the US and continued his film work, but increasingly appeared on American radio and television channels, and later on their British counterparts. In the latter medium he appeared frequently in the Four Star Playhouse series, as well as producing some editions. For his roles in both television and on film, Niven was honoured with two stars on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.[4] He died in 1983 from a virulent form of motor neurone disease at the age of 73.[5]

Filmography[edit]

Niven with the Academy Award he won for the 1959 film Separate Tables
Niven, photographed in 1973 by Allan Warren
Filmography and awards of David Niven[1]
Film[6][7] Year Role Notes
There Goes the Bride 1932 Uncredited[8]
Eyes of Fate 1933 Uncredited[9]
Cleopatra 1934 Uncredited[10]
All the Winners 1934 Uncredited[11]
Without Regret 1935 Bill Gage[12]
Barbary Coast 1935 Cockney sailor Uncredited[13]
A Feather in Her Hat 1935 Leo Cartwright[14]
Splendor 1935 Clancey Lorrimore[15]
Mutiny on the Bounty 1935 Uncredited[16]
Rose Marie 1936 Teddy[17]
Palm Springs 1936 George Brittel[18]
Dodsworth 1936 Captain Clyde Lockert
Thank You, Jeeves! 1936 Bertie Wooster[19]
The Charge of the Light Brigade 1936 Captain James Randall
Beloved Enemy 1936 Gerald Preston
We Have Our Moments 1937 Joe Gilling[20]
The Prisoner of Zenda 1937 Count Fritz von Tarlenheim
Dinner at the Ritz 1937 Paul de Brack
Bluebeard's Eighth Wife 1938 Albert de Regnier
Four Men and a Prayer 1938 Chris[21]
Three Blind Mice 1938 Steve Harrington[22]
The Dawn Patrol 1938 Lt. Scott
Wuthering Heights 1939 Edgar Linton
Bachelor Mother 1939 David Merlin
The Real Glory 1939 Lt Terrence McCool
Eternally Yours 1939 Tony "The Great Arturo" Halstead
Raffles 1939 A.J. Raffles
The First of the Few 1942 Geoffrey Crisp
The Way Ahead 1944 Lt Jim Perry
A Matter of Life and Death 1946 Peter David Carter
Magnificent Doll 1946 Aaron Burr
The Perfect Marriage 1947 Dale Williams[23]
The Other Love 1947 Dr Anthony Stanton[24]
The Bishop's Wife 1947 Henry Brougham
Bonnie Prince Charlie 1948 Prince Charles Edward Stuart
Enchantment 1948 General Sir Roland Dane[25]
A Kiss in the Dark 1949 Eric Phillips
A Kiss for Corliss 1949 Kenneth Marquis
The Elusive Pimpernel 1950 Sir Percy Blakeney
The Toast of New Orleans 1950 Jacques Riboudeaux
Happy Go Lovely 1951 B.G. Bruno
Soldiers Three 1951 Captain Pindenny
Appointment with Venus 1951 Major Valentine Morland
The Lady Says No 1952 Bill Shelby
The Moon Is Blue 1953 David Slater Winner, Golden Globe Award for Best Actor at the 11th Golden Globe Awards[26]
The Love Lottery 1954 Rex Allerton
Happy Ever After 1954 Jasper O'Leary
Carrington V.C. 1955 Major "Copper" Carrington, V.C. Nominated, BAFTA Award for Best British Actor at the 8th British Academy Film Awards[27]
The King's Thief 1955 Duke of Brampton
The Birds and the Bees 1956 Colonel Harris
The Silken Affair 1956 Roger Tweakham
Around the World in 80 Days 1956 Phileas Fogg
Oh, Men! Oh, Women! 1957 Dr. Alan Coles
The Little Hut 1957 Henry Brittingham-Brett
My Man Godfrey 1957 Godfrey Nominated, Golden Globe Award for Best Actor at the 15th Golden Globe Awards[28]
Bonjour Tristesse 1958 Raymond
Separate Tables 1958 Major Pollock Winner, Academy Award for Best Actor at the 31st Academy Awards;[29]
Golden Globe Award for Best Actor at the 16th Golden Globe Awards[30]
New York Film Critics Circle Award for Best Actor at the 1958 Awards[31]
Ask Any Girl 1959 Miles Doughton
Happy Anniversary 1959 Chris Walters
Please Don't Eat the Daisies 1960 Larry Mackay
The Guns of Navarone 1961 Corporal Miller
Il giorno più corto 1962 Released internationally as The Shortest Day[32]
The Captive City 1962 Major Peter Whitfield Originally titled La Città Prigioniera[33]
The Best of Enemies 1962 Major Richardson Originally titled I Due Nemici[34]
The Road to Hong Kong 1962 Lady Chatterley's Lover lama[35]
Guns of Darkness 1962 Tom Jordan
55 Days at Peking 1963 Sir Arthur Robertson
The Pink Panther 1963 Sir Charles Litton
Bedtime Story 1964 Lawrence Jamison
Where the Spies Are 1965 Dr Love
Lady L 1965 Lord Lendale
Eye of the Devil 1966 Philippe de Montfaucon
Casino Royale 1967 Sir James Bond
Prudence and the Pill 1968 Gerald Hardcastle
The Impossible Years 1968 Jonathan Kingsley
The Extraordinary Seaman 1969 Lt. Commander Finchhaven
The Brain 1969 The Brain Originally titled Le Cerveau[36]
Before Winter Comes 1969 Major Giles Burnside
The Statue 1971 Alex Bolt
King, Queen, Knave 1972 Charles Dreyer Originally titled Herzbube[37]
The Canterville Ghost 1974 Ghost
Vampira 1974 Count Dracula
Paper Tiger 1975 Walter Bradbury
The Remarkable Rocket 1975 Narrator
No Deposit, No Return 1976 J. W. Osborne
Murder by Death 1976 Dick Charleston
Candleshoe 1977 Priory
Death on the Nile 1978 Colonel Race
A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square 1979 Ivan/General Bernard Drew
Escape to Athena 1979 Professor Blake
Rough Cut 1980 Chief Inspector Cyril Willis
The Sea Wolves 1980 Colonel Bill Grice
Better Late Than Never 1982 Nicholas Cartland
Trail of the Pink Panther 1982 Sir Charles Litton Voice dubbed by Rich Little[38]
Curse of the Pink Panther 1983 Sir Charles Litton Voice dubbed by Rich Little[38]
  • ^1 This list also includes film specific awards and nominations won by Niven, but not the career awards, which consisted of:

Stage credits[edit]

Niven in the 1950 musical The Toast of New Orleans
Stage credits of David Niven
Production[41] Date Theatre Role Notes
The Wedding 1935 Pasadena Playhouse, Pasadena, CA One performance only[42]
Nina 5 December 1951 – 12 January 52 Royale Theatre, New York Gerard 45 performances[42]
The Moon is Blue 8 July – October 1952 United Nations Theatre David Slater

Radio broadcasts[edit]

Radio broadcasts of David Niven
Broadcast[43] Date Channel Notes
Shell Chateau 16 July 1936 NBC
Lux Radio Theatre: "The Gilded Lily" 11 January 1937 NBC
In the British Army 10 March 1938 NBC
The Rudy Vallée Show 17 November 1938 NBC
The Chase and Sanborn Hour 21 May 1939 NBC
Radio Tribute to the King and Queen of England 11 June 1939
The Chase and Sanborn Hour 24 September 1939 NBC
Silver Theater: "Ex Spy" 22 October 1939 NBC
The Walter O'Keefe Show 7 November 1939 ABC Radio
Bob Hope Entertains the Troops 17 July 1943
Sealtest Variety Theater 24 March 1943 NBC
Information Please 17 December 1945 NBC
The Hour of Mystery 1 September 1946 ABC Radio
Lux Radio Theatre: "Frenchman's Creek" 10 February 1947 CBS
This is Hollywood 17 May 1947 CBS
Hi Jinx! 26 June 1947 NBC
Hollywood Hotel 9 November 1947 ABC Radio
Kraft Music Hall 26 February 1948 NBC
Hollywood Star Preview 9 May 1948
Mary Margaret McBride Program 17 February 1949 NBC
The Hallmark Playhouse: "Berkeley Square" 3 March 1949 CBS
Screen Guild Players: "Enchantment" 24 March 1949 CBS As General Sir Roland Dane in adaptation of Enchantment[44]
Screen Guild Players: "Stairway to Heaven" 23 June 1949 CBS As Peter Carter in adaptation of A Matter of Life and Death[44]
NBC University Theatre: "Nineteen Eighty-Four" 27 August 1949 NBC As Winston Smith in adaptation of Nineteen Eighty-Four[44]
Anacin Hollywood Start Theater: "Next Door to Yesterday 8 October 1949
Hollywood Watch 16 October 1949
Camel Screen Guild Theater: "A Kiss in the Dark" 27 October 1949 CBS As Eric Phillips in adaptation of A Kiss in the Dark[44]
Theater Guild on the Air: "Brief Encounter" 13 November 1949 CBS
Lux Radio Theatre: "The Bishop's Wife" 19 December 1949 CBS As Henry Brougham in adaptation of The Bishop's Wife[45]
Theater Guild on the Air: "I Know Where I'm Going" 15 October 1950 CBS
The Hedda Hopper Show 25 February 1951 ABC Radio
Theater Guild on the Air: "This Woman Business" 23 September 1951 CBS
Philip Morris Playhouse on Broadway: "Brief Encounter" 25 September 1951
Theater Guild on the Air: "The Thief" 27 January 1952 CBS
The Bing Crosby Show 14 May 1952 CBS
Hollywood Star Theater 1 June 1952
Hollywood Star Theater: "The Long Shot" 8 June 1952
The Bob Hope Show 5 March 1954 NBC
The Bob Hope Show 15 March 1954 NBC
The Bob Hope Show 4 November 1954 NBC
The Bob Hope Show 3 March 1955 NBC
Lux Radio Theatre: "Stairway to Heaven" 3 April 1955 CBS As Peter Carter in adaptation of A Matter of Life and Death[46]
Please Don't Eat the Daisies 22 February 1960
Weekend Woman's Hour 22 July 1971 BBC Radio 4
Kaleidoscope 8 August 1973 BBC Radio 4
David Niven 9 March 1974 BBC Radio 4
The Fred Astaire Story 23 February 1975 BBC Radio 2
Noël: The Life and Times of Noël Coward 5 March 1975 BBC Radio 4
The Fred Astaire Story 26 March 1973 BBC Radio 2
The Fred Astaire Story 23 April 1975 BBC Radio 2
David Niven 23 September 1975 BBC Radio 2
Kaleidoscope 15 February 1977 BBC Radio 4
Desert Island Discs 26 April 1977 BBC Radio 4
John Dunn Show 29 July 1981 BBC Radio 2

Television[edit]

Niven, with the cast of The Rogues, 1964
Television appearances of David Niven[1]
Programme[6][47] Date Channel Role Notes
Nash Airflyte Theater: "Portrait of Lydia" 5 October 1950 CBS Adapted from a work by A.A. Milne[48]
Schlitz Playhouse of Stars: "Not a Chance" 5 October 1951 CBS
Celanese Theater: "The Petrified Forest" 20 February 1952 ABC Adapted from a play by Robert E. Sherwood
The Jack Benny Program: "The David Niven Story" 2 May 1952 CBS
Robert Montgomery Presents: "The Sheffield Story" 27 October 1952 NBC
Four Star Playhouse: "South Sea Doctor" 4 December 1952 CBS
Hollywood Opening Night: "Sword Play" 15 December 1952 NBC
Four Star Playhouse: "Man on a train" 15 January 1953 CBS William Langford Niven also produced this episode.[49]
Four Star Playhouse: "No Identity" 12 March 1953 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Night Ride" 7 May 1953 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Mr. Bingham" 4 June 1953 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Finale" 24 September 1953 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "A Matter of Advice" 29 October 1953 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "For Art's Sake" 26 November 1953 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "A Man of the World" 17 December 1953 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "The Bomb" 18 February 1954 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Operation in Money" 11 March 1954 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "The Book" 1 April 1954 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Village in the City" 22 April 1954 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Never Explain" 7 October 1954 CBS
Light's Diamond Jubilee: "The Girls in Their Summer Dresses" 24 October 1954 ABC, CBS, NBC, and DuMont
Four Star Playhouse: "Vote of Confidence" 11 November 1954 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Meet a Lonely Man" 2 December 1954 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "The Answer" 23 December 1954 CBS Deacon Niven also produced this episode;[50]
Nominated, Emmy Award for Best Actor in a Single Performance at the 7th Primetime Emmy Awards[39]
The Star and the Story: "The Thin Line" 6 January 1955 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Breakfast in Bed" 20 January 1955 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Tusitala" 24 February 1955 CBS Robert Louis Stevenson
Four Star Playhouse: "Henry and the Psychopathic Horse" 17 March 1955 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "The Collar" 7 April 1955 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Uncle Fred Flits By" 5 May 1955 CBS Uncle Fred Niven also produced this episode;
adapted from a P.G. Wodehouse story[51]
Four Star Playhouse: "Broken Journey" 2 June 1955 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Firing Squad" 6 October 1955 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Full Circle" 27 October 1955 CBS Maxwell
Four Star Playhouse: "Here Comes the Suit" 17 November 1955 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Tunnel of Fear" 19 January 1956 CBS Jerry Larkin Niven also produced this episode.[52]
Four Star Playhouse: "Safe Keeping" 9 February 1956 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Red Wine" 8 March 1956 CBS Wilson
Four Star Playhouse: "The Rites of Spring" 4 April 1956 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Touch and Go" 26 April 1956 CBS
Four Star Playhouse: "Second Chance" 14 June 1956 CBS
Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater: "Village of Fear" 15 March 1957 CBS Allen Raikes
This is Scotland 31 August 1957 Scottish Television Opening night of Scottish Television[53]
Alcoa Theatre: "Circumstantial" 7 October 1957 NBC
Alcoa-Goodyear Theatre: "Danger By Night" 28 October 1957
Alcoa Theatre: "In the Dark" 13 January 1958 NBC
Alcoa Theatre: "Night Caller" 10 February 1958 NBC
Alcoa Theatre: "My Wife's Next Husband" 21 April 1958 NBC
Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater: "The Accused" 30 October 1958 CBS
The June Allyson Show: "The Trench Coat" 11 January 1960 CBS
Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater: "Wayfarers" 21 January 1960 CBS As director[54]
Close-Up: "Location Story of The Guns of Navarone" 24 November 1960 ITV Interviewee[55]
The Dick Powell Show: "Everybody Loves Sweeney" 22 January 1963 NBC
The Dick Powell Show: "Luxury Liner" 12 February 1963 NBC
The Dick Powell Show: "Apples Don't Fall Far" 19 February 1963 NBC
The Dick Powell Show: "Epilogue" 2 April 1963 NBC
Academy Awards Presentation 2 April 1964 ABC Host
The Rogues: "The Personal Touch" 13 September 1964 NBC Alec Fleming
The Rogues: "The Stefanini Dowry" 27 September 1964 NBC Alec Fleming
The Rogues: "Viva Diaz!" 4 October 1964 NBC Alec Fleming
The Rogues: "Fringe Benefits" 22 November 1964 NBC Alec Fleming
The Rogues: "Bless You, Mr Carter Huntington" 17 January 1965 NBC Alec Fleming
The Rogues: "Mr White's Christmas" 4 April 1965 NBC Alec Fleming
The Rogues: "A Daring Step Backward" 18 April 1965 NBC Alec Fleming
All Eyes On Sharon Tate 1967 Interviewee
Scotland Yard 30 March 1971 NBC Narrator
Aquarius 9 October 1971 ITV Interviewee
Personal View: David Niven 1972
Parkinson 14 October 1972 BBC1
Survival Special: "The Forbidden Desert Of The Danaki" 25 April 1973 ITV Narrator
The Bluffers 28 May 1974 NBC Narrator
The British Screen Awards 26 February 1975 BBC1
Bell System Family Theatre: "The Canterville Ghost" 10 March 1975 NBC Sir Simon de Canterville
Parkinson 20 September 1975 BBC1
Survival Special: "Safari by Balloon" 24 December 1975 ITV Narrator
David Niven's World 1976 Narrator
Film Night: "David Niven" 8 January 1976 BBC2
Survival Special: "The Family That Lives With Elephants" 29 February 1976 ITV Narrator
Looks Familiar 23 September 1976 ITV
The Billion Dollar Movies 1977
The Hollywood Greats: "Errol Flynn" 11 August 1977 BBC1
The Hollywood Greats: "Ronald Colman" 10 August 1978 BBC1
Survival Special: "The Leopard That Changed Its Spots" 22 December 1978 ITV Narrator
A Man Called Intrepid 20 – 22 May 1979 NBC
Survival Special: "Penguin Islands" 26 December 1980 ITV Narrator
Portrait of a Great Lady 1981
The AFI Life Achievement Award: Salute To Fred Astaire 18 April 1981 CBS Niven hosted the AFI Life Achievement Award given to Fred Astaire[56]
Parkinson 3 October 1981 BBC1

Books[edit]

Books by David Niven
Title[57] Year Genre Publisher Ref.
Round the Rugged Rocks 1951 Novel London: Cresset Press [58]
The Moon's a Balloon 1972 Autobiography London: Hamilton [59]
Bring on the Empty Horses 1975 Autobiography London: Hamilton [60]
Go Slowly, Come Back Quickly 1981 Novel London: Hamilton [61]

Discography[edit]

Album recordings by David Niven
Album Year Ref.
The Second Elizabeth 1952 [62]
David Niven: The Moon's a Balloon 1977 [63]
The Enchanted Orchestra 1979 [64]
Bring on the Empty Horses 1980 [65]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b McFarlane, Brian. "Niven, David (1910–1983)". Screenonline. British Film Institute. Retrieved 5 July 2013. 
  2. ^ a b c Morley 2004.
  3. ^ "The BFI 100: 11–20". British Film Institute. Archived from the original on 3 June 2004. Retrieved 5 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "David Niven". Hollywood Walk of Fame. Retrieved 14 July 2013. 
  5. ^ Lord 2003, p. 321.
  6. ^ a b "Filmography: Niven, David". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  7. ^ Fowler 1995, pp. 57–179.
  8. ^ Fowler 1995, p. 57.
  9. ^ "David Niven". Turner Classic Movies. Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  10. ^ Garrett 1975, p. 27.
  11. ^ Fowler 1995, p. 58.
  12. ^ Fowler 1995, p. 48.
  13. ^ "Cast: Barbary Coast". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 19 June 2013. 
  14. ^ "Cast: A Feather in Her Hat". Catalog of Feature Films. American Film Institute. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  15. ^ "Cast: Splendor". Catalog of Feature Films. American Film Institute. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  16. ^ Fowler 1995, p. 60.
  17. ^ "Cast: Rose-Marie". Catalog of Feature Films. American Film Institute. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  18. ^ Garrett 1975, p. 34.
  19. ^ "Thank You, Jeeves!". Catalog of Feature Films. American Film Institute. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  20. ^ Garrett 1975, p. 42.
  21. ^ Garrett 1975, p. 49.
  22. ^ Garrett 1975, p. 52.
  23. ^ Garrett 1975, p. 78.
  24. ^ Garrett 1975, p. 82.
  25. ^ Garrett 1975, p. 90.
  26. ^ "The 11th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1954)". Golden Globe Awards. Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  27. ^ "Film: British Actor in 1955". BAFTA Awards Database. British Academy of Film and Television Arts. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  28. ^ "The 15th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1958)". Golden Globe Awards. Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  29. ^ "The 31st Academy Awards (1959) Nominees and Winners". Oscar Legacy. Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  30. ^ "The 16th Annual Golden Globe Awards (1959)". Golden Globe Awards. Hollywood Foreign Press Association. Retrieved 13 June 2013. 
  31. ^ "New York Film Critics Circle Awards: 1958 Awards". New York Film Critics Circle. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  32. ^ Fowler 1995, p. 145.
  33. ^ "La Città Prigioniera (1962)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  34. ^ "I Due Nemici (1961)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  35. ^ "The Road to Hong Kong (1961)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  36. ^ "Le Cerveau (1969)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  37. ^ "Herzbube (1972)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 June 2013. 
  38. ^ a b Fowler 1995, pp. 176–77.
  39. ^ a b c Fowler 1995, p. 217.
  40. ^ Leitch, Luke (2 February 2005). "'Darcy' will hand accolade to best of British cinema". Evening Standard (London). p. 18. 
  41. ^ Fowler 1995, pp. 181–83.
  42. ^ a b Fowler 1995, p. 181.
  43. ^ Fowler 1995, pp. 185–91.
  44. ^ a b c d Fowler 1995, p. 188.
  45. ^ Fowler 1995, p. 189.
  46. ^ Fowler 1995, p. 190.
  47. ^ Fowler 1995, pp. 199–210.
  48. ^ "Nash Airflyte Theater: Portrait of Lydia (1950)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 21 June 2013. 
  49. ^ "Four Star Playhouse: Man on a train (1953)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 21 June 2013. 
  50. ^ "Four Star Playhouse: The Answer (1954)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 21 June 2013. 
  51. ^ "Uncle Fred Flits By (1955)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 21 June 2013. 
  52. ^ "Tunnel of Fear (1956)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 21 June 2013. 
  53. ^ "This is Scotland (1957)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  54. ^ "Dick Powell's Zane Grey Theater: Wayfarers (1960)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  55. ^ "Close-Up: Location Story of The Guns of Navarone (1960)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  56. ^ "The AFI Life Achievement Award: Salute To Fred Astaire (1981)". Film & TV Database. British Film Institute. Retrieved 4 July 2013. 
  57. ^ Fowler 1995, pp. 211–15.
  58. ^ "Round the Rugged Rocks". British Library. Retrieved 14 June 2013. 
  59. ^ "The Moon's a Balloon: Reminiscences". Retrieved 14 June 2013. 
  60. ^ "Bring on the Empty Horses / David Niven". Retrieved 14 June 2013. 
  61. ^ "Go Slowly, Come Back Quickly / by David Niven". Retrieved 14 June 2013. 
  62. ^ "Classical Reviews". Billboard 64 (16): 30. 19 April 1952. 
  63. ^ "David Niven: The Moon's a Balloon". British Library. Retrieved 9 July 2013. 
  64. ^ "The Enchanted Orchestra". British Library. Retrieved 9 July 2013. 
  65. ^ "Bring on the Empty Horses". British Library. Retrieved 9 July 2013. 

Bibliography[edit]

External links[edit]