David Nutter

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
David Nutter
David Nutter by Gage Skidmore.jpg
Nutter at the San Diego Comic-Con International in July 2012.
Born 1960
United States
Nationality American
Occupation Television director, film director, television producer
Years active 1985–present

David Nutter (born 1960) is an American television and film director and television producer. He is best known for directing pilot episodes for television.

Early life and education[edit]

Nutter was born in 1960 and attended the University of Miami.

Career[edit]

Nutter's big break came in 1993, when he began directing episodes of The X-Files. From there he would go on to direct the pilot, and help with the creation of, Space: Above and Beyond, Millennium, Sleepwalkers, Roswell, Dark Angel, Smallville, Tarzan, Without a Trace, Dr. Vegas, Jack & Bobby, Supernatural, Traveler, Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles, The Mentalist, and Shameless.

He also directed "Replacements", the fourth part of the mini-series Band of Brothers, and shared in that series's Emmy Award for Outstanding Directing for a Miniseries, Movie or a Dramatic Special. Other directing highlights include "Join the Club", an Emmy-nominated episode of The Sopranos, and the 1998 feature film Disturbing Behavior.

Nutter directed episodes of the HBO series Entourage, including "The Resurrection", "The Prince's Bride" and the series finale, "The End."

In 2008, LG used Nutter's pilot expertise to create a campaign for its new "Scarlet" line of HDTVs, by creating a promotional clip in the style of a trailer for a TV pilot.[1]

In 2011, Nutter directed the pilot of Rina Mimoun's The Doctor, for CBS.[2]

In 2012, Nutter directed episodes six and seven of Game of Thrones season 2. In 2013, he directed the last two episodes of Game of Thrones season 3.

Nutter also directed The CW pilot Arrow, based on the comic-book character The Green Arrow, starring Stephen Amell.

List of directed pilots[edit]

The first sixteen pilots that Nutter directed have all gone to series.[3] This streak was broken in 2011 when CBS chose to not pick up The Doctor.

References[edit]

External links[edit]