David OReilly (artist)

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David OReilly (1985, Kilkenny, Ireland) is an Irish film maker and artist based in Los Angeles, California, US. He is known for creating distinctive 3d animated films.

Work[edit]

Aside from a 1-minute film entitled Ident from which he draws his logo, the earliest work available on his website is WOFL2106.[1] This short draws equally on original designs and popular internet memes to create a disturbing landscape of serenity juxtaposed with chaos. This film sets the tone for his entire œuvre, though the direct inclusion of outside memes disappears in his later work.

He created several animation sequences and props for the 2007 film Son of Rambow.[2] As well as animation for the "guide" sequences in Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, with Shynola.[3]

He created the first video for Irish rock band U2's single "I'll Go Crazy If I Don't Go Crazy Tonight."[4] The video was released on U2.com on July 21, 2009.

His short film, Please Say Something, was awarded the Golden Bear at the 2009 Berlin International Film Festival, Best Narrative Short at the 2009 Ottawa International Animation Festival[5] and several other awards.[6]

His short film, The External World, premiered at the 67th Venice Film Festival and the 2011 Sundance Film Festival, and has since won over forty awards on its festival circuit including the IFTA for Best Animation.[7]

He wrote, directed, produced and animated the Adventure Time episode "A Glitch is a Glitch" for Cartoon Network, becoming the first guest director in the network’s 20 year history. In 2013 he worked on the Spike Jonze movie Her as animation director on the sequences where the characters are playing video games. Shortly after working on Her, he announced via Twitter[8] that he would be releasing a game. According to his website, "Mountain is a mountain simulator" that features no controls, automatic save and approximately 50 hours of gameplay among other things.[9] Mountain initially premiered at E3 2014 at its "Museum of Contemporary Art" and became available to the public on iOS, Windows and Mac on the 1st of July, 2014 and was received with general curiosity and confusion from various news outlets.[10][11]

Style[edit]

OReilly's work is often characterized by the use of intentionally stripped down 3d graphics. He is known for popularizing the use of low-poly 3d and the use of 3d software as a personal and artistic tool, as outlined in his 2009 essay "Basic Animation Aesthetics".[12] He was an early adopter of glitch effects[13] and uses elements of the software used inside his work.[14] "[David] has been the man to lead animation through a conceptual blockage—3D animation was being dominated by commercial aesthetics....he deconstructed 3D to the point of absurdity.".[15]

Octocat Adventure[edit]

On March 13, 2008, a YouTube user named RANDYPETERS1, a 9-year-old boy from Chicago, submitted a handdrawn animated video about Octocat, a red cat head with eight long legs looking for his parents. The videos featured crude MS Paint animation and a loud, highpitched, childlike voice narrating. On September 7, the fifth, final episode was released, but featured an unexpected twist - about 20 seconds into it, the crude sketchy animation switched to intricately crafted 3D with an orchestral soundtrack; the whole Octocat story (and as such, the Randy Peters persona) was revealed to be by David OReilly.[16] In an interview he said "I wanted to try experimenting with the Youtube audience and Microsoft Paint. The story for Octocat came to me by reading the bible word-for-word backwards".[17]

Short films[edit]

Music videos[edit]

  • Szamar Madar (Venetian Snares, 2005, 4 min)
  • I'll Go Crazy If I Don't Go Crazy Tonight (U2, 2009, 4 min)[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "THE DAVID OREILLY INTERNET WEBSITE -- Work". Retrieved 2011-09-21. 
  2. ^ Wolff, Ellen (2008-05-02). "David OReilly: The 'Wrist' Behind Son of Rambow". Animation World Magazine. Retrieved 2008-09-10. 
  3. ^ "IMDB page". IMDB. September 10, 2008. Retrieved 2008-09-10. 
  4. ^ a b "Go Crazy". U2.com. 2009-06-17. 
  5. ^ "Ottawa International Animation Festival - About OIAF 11". Animationfestival.ca. Retrieved 2012-04-17. 
  6. ^ "Please Say Something". Short Film Central. Retrieved 2012-04-17. 
  7. ^ "The External World". davidoreilly.com. 2011-06-30. 
  8. ^ "Mountain announced via Twitter". 2014-07-01. 
  9. ^ "Mountain Press Sheet". 2014-07-01. 
  10. ^ "The Mountain is a procedurally-generated psychedelic "art horror", bound to hit iOS soon". 2014-07-01. 
  11. ^ "More invasive than Facebook: 'Mountain' from creator of games in 'Her'". 2014-07-01. 
  12. ^ "Article on Basic Animation Aesthetics". 
  13. ^ "Artful error". Retrieved 2012-05-21. 
  14. ^ "Juxtapoz Profile". Retrieved 2012-05-21. 
  15. ^ "SOTW Awards". Retrieved 2012-05-21. 
  16. ^ Octocat Adventures (HD)
  17. ^ About author meg. "Q & A with Irish animator David O'Reilly | meg". Meg.ie. Retrieved 2012-04-17. 
  18. ^ Cone, Justin (2008-09-09). "David O’Reilly: Octocat Adventure 5". Motionographer. Retrieved 2008-09-10. 
  19. ^ OReilly, David (2008-09-07). "OCTOCAT ADVENTURE". David OReilly. Retrieved 2008-09-10. 
  20. ^ "RGB XYZ (2008)". IMDB. September 10, 2008. Retrieved 2008-09-10. 

External links[edit]