David Ogilvy, 10th Earl of Airlie

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David Graham Drummond Ogilvy, 10th Earl of Airlie KT, DL (4 May 1826 – 25 September 1881),[1] styled Lord Ogilvy from birth until 1849, was a Scottish peer.

Background and education[edit]

He was the oldest son of David Ogilvy, 9th Earl of Airlie and his first wife Clementina, daughter of Gavin Drummond.[2] Ogilvy was educated at Christ Church College, Oxford, where he graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in 1847.[3] Two years later, he succeeded his father as earl.[3] In 1879, Ogilvy received a Honorary Doctorate of Laws by the University of Glasgow.[4]

Career[edit]

Ogilvy became a Deputy Lieutenant for Forfarshire in 1847.[2] He was elected a representative peer to the House of Lords in 1850[2] and served as captain of the Forfarshire Yeomanry Cavalry and the 12th Forfarshire Rifle Volunteers from 1856.[3] Ogily was invested as a Knight of the Order of the Thistle in 1862.[5] In 1872, he was appointed Lord High Commissioner to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland, an office he held until the following year.[6]

Family and death[edit]

On 23 September 1851, he married (Henrietta) Blanche (30 July 1830 – 5 January 1921, aged 90), second daughter of Edward Stanley, 2nd Baron Stanley of Alderley, and Henrietta Stanley, Baroness Stanley of Alderley, at Alderley, Cheshire, and had by her two sons and four daughters.[6] [7]Ogilvy died at Denver, Colorado in 1881 and was succeeded in his titles by his older son David.[6]

  • Lady (Henrietta) Blanche Ogilvy (b. 8 Nov 1852, d. 23 Mar 1925) married 28 September 1873 Colonel Sir Henry Montague Hozier, and had issue, including Clementine Ogilvy Hozier, who became the wife of Winston Churchill.
  • Lady Clementina Gertrude Helen Ogilvy (19 Jun 1854 – 30 Apr 1932) married 31 December 1874 Algernon Freeman-Mitford, 1st Baron Redesdale; their granddaughter Nancy Mitford edited the letters of the Stanley family. Another granddaughter Jessica Mitford married her second cousin Esmond Romilly (grandson of Lady Blanche Hozier).
  • Lt.-Col. David Stanley William Ogilvy, 11th (or 6th) Earl of Airlie (20 Jan 1856 – 11 Jun 1900, killed in action in the Boer War); married Lady Mabell Gore, and had issue. They were grandparents of Angus Ogilvy who married Princess Alexandra of Kent.
  • Lady Maude Josepha Ogilvy (16 Nov 1859 – 3 Apr 1933); married 12 October 1886 Theodore George Willan Whyte, and had issue.
  • Hon. Lyulph Gilchrist Stanley Ogilvy (25 Jun 1861 - Apr 1947); he married 27 August 1902 Edith Gertrude Boothroyd, in Colorado, USA, and had issue.
  • Lady Griselda Johanna Helen Ogilvy (20 Dec 1865 – 12 Feb 1934); married 22 December 1897 James Cheape, and had issue.


His daughter Lady Blanche (1852-1925) was the mother of Clementine Hozier, who from 1908 until her death in 1965 was married to Winston Churchill; and of Nellie Hozier, the mother of the British socialist Esmond Romilly and the journalist Giles Romilly.[8]

Another daughter, Lady Clementina (1854-1932), married Algernon Freeman-Mitford, 1st Baron Redesdale and was a grandmother of the Mitford sisters.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Leigh Rayment - Peerage". Retrieved 15 July 2009. 
  2. ^ a b c Dod, Robert P. (1860). The Peerage, Baronetage and Knightage of Great Britain and Ireland. London: Whitaker and Co. p. 86. 
  3. ^ a b c Debrett, John (1876). Debrett's Illustrated Peerage and Titles of Courtesy. London: Dean & Son. pp. 16–17. 
  4. ^ "ThePeerage - David Graham Drummond Ogilvy, 5th Earl of Airlie". Retrieved 15 July 2009. 
  5. ^ "Leigh Rayment - Knights of the Thistle". Retrieved 15 July 2009. 
  6. ^ a b c Douglas, Sir Robert (1904). Sir James Balfour Paul, ed. The Scots Peerage. vol. I. Edinburgh: David Douglas. pp. 131–132. 
  7. ^ The manner of his proposal and his acceptance in early August is related by Blanche's mother to her husband in a letter date 4 August 1851
  8. ^ The Peerage, downloaded 01-10-2012
Peerage of Scotland
Preceded by
David Ogilvy
Earl of Airlie
1849–1881
Succeeded by
David Stanley William Ogilvy