David Ray Boggs

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David Ray Boggs
Born (1943-09-08) September 8, 1943 (age 71)
Morrisville, North Carolina, United States
Awards 1970 NASCAR Grand American Rookie of the Year
NASCAR Sprint Cup Series career
32 races run over 3 years
Best finish 26th (1972)
First race 1971 Myers Brothers 250 (Bowman Gray)
Last race 1973 Rebel 500 (Darlington)
Wins Top tens Poles
0 2 0
NASCAR Xfinity Series career
3 races run over 3 years
Best finish 92nd (1986)
First race 1983 Miller Time 300 (Charlotte)
Last race 1986 Protecta-Liner 200 (Rockingham)
Wins Top tens Poles
0 0 0
NASCAR Grand National East Series career
11 races run over 2 years
Best finish 9th (1973)
First race 1972 Greenville 200 (Greenville-Pickens)
Last race 1973 Tar Heel 200 (Fayetteville)
Wins Top tens Poles
0 4 0

David Ray Boggs (born Sep 8, 1943 in Morrisville, North Carolina) is a American stock car racing driver. Now retired, he is a former competitor in the NASCAR Grand American Series, the NASCAR Winston Cup Series, and the ARCA Racing Series.

NASCAR career[edit]

Boggs made his debut in NASCAR competition in 1970, winning Rookie of the Year in the Grand American series.[1] He moved up to the Winston Cup Series in 1971, making his debut at Bowman Gray Stadium and finishing ninth; he would compete in 32 races over three seasons, posting a best finish of sixth at Dover Downs International Speedway later that year.[2] Boggs' Winston Cup career would be remembered most for a cut tire starting a wreck during the qualifying races for the 1972 Daytona 500 that resulted in the death of Friday Hassler.[3] Hassler also competed in 11 races in the Grand National East Division in 1972 and 1973 with a best finish of fifth.[4] Following his Winston Cup career, Boggs returned to North Carolina's short tracks, competing in late model stock cars.[5]

Boggs returned to NASCAR competition in the Busch Series between 1983 and 1986, running three races with a best finish of 21st;[6] In his final race in the series at North Carolina Motor Speedway he suffered broken legs in a crash.[7] Boggs attempted a comeback in the series in 2002, attempting to qualify for the season-opening race at Daytona International Speedway, but failed to make the race.[8]

ARCA career[edit]

Boggs made his debut in Automobile Racing Club of America competition in 1973, running five races that were co-sanctioned with the NASCAR Grand National East Series; after competing in a few events in the series in the late 1980s, he became a regular competitor in ARCA during the 1990s. His best finish, fifth, came in a rain-shortened race at Lowe's Motor Speedway in 2003.[9] Boggs retired from competition following the 2007 season.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Isaac receives title trophies". Wilmington Morning Star (Wilmington, NC). February 10, 1971. p. 2D. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  2. ^ "David Ray Boggs - NASCAR Sprint Cup Results". Racing-Reference. USA Today Sports Media Group. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  3. ^ "Friday Hassler Killed In 13-Car Crash Qualifying For Daytona 500 Contest". The Gettysburg Times (Gettysburg, PA). February 18, 1972. p. 13. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  4. ^ "David Ray Boggs Grand National East Series Results". Racing-Reference. USA Today Sports Media Group. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  5. ^ "Edwards, Boggs continue duel". Wilmington Morning Star (Wilmington, NC). May 11, 1979. p. 4C. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  6. ^ "David Ray Boggs NASCAR Nationwide Series Results". Racing-Reference. USA Today Sports Media Group. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  7. ^ "Earnhardt race victor". The Vindicator (Youngstown, OH). March 2, 1986. p. D10. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  8. ^ "Track Dries Nemechek Flies". Motor Racing Network. February 14, 2002. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  9. ^ "NASCAR Report". The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (Atlanta, GA). October 11, 2013. p. G7. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 
  10. ^ "David Ray Boggs - ARCA Racing Series Results". Racing-Reference. USA Today Sports Media Group. Retrieved 2013-10-11. 

External links[edit]