David de Vries

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David de Vries
Born 1961
Wellington, New Zealand
Occupation Filmmaker, screenwriter, director, producer, editor, Cartoonist, writer, artist, publisher, designer
Nationality Australian, New Zealander
Genre Adventure, Super Heros, Pulp Fiction, Thriller, Horror, Sci Fi, Fantasy, Comedy

David de Vries is an Australian film writer, director and producer and a comic book artist and writer.

David de Vries was born in Wellington, New Zealand in 1961,[1] growing up in the inner suburb of Ngaio, before emigrating to Melbourne at an early age with his parents, where he lived until he was eighteen.[1] After studying painting at RMIT he started his comic book career in the early 1980s with work for OzComics, Phantastique, MAD Magazine and Penthouse.[2] Together with Gary Chaloner, Glenn Lumsden and Tad Pietrzykowski he established Cyclone Comics in 1985, to ensure that their characters could be published while remaining under their control.[2]

de Vries and Lumsden entered the American market through First Comics, Nicotat and Malibu Graphics with The Southern Squadron, a superhero team that had taken over the Cyclone title.[1][3] Together they have drawn a new look version of The Phantom for Marvel Comics,[1][3][4] have worked on Batman: Legends of the Dark Knight[1][5] Star Trek comics for DC Comics,[3][4][6] The Eternal Warrior Yearbook for Valiant Comics, The Puppet Master for Eternity Comics[3][4] and Planet of the Apes and Flesh Gordon for Malibu Comics.[3][4] de Vries also worked on a number of projects as a writer, including The Thing From Another World for First Comics, Black Lightning and a Green Lantern annual for DC, as well as recreating the origin of Captain Boomerang with John Ostrander in an episode of the Suicide Squad.

de Vries currently lives in South Australia where he founded the Barossa Studios with Lumsden, David Heinrich, Rod Tobely and Dave Williams,[2][7] doing artwork for magazines like Picture, People, Ralph, The Australian Financial Review and The Bulletin.[5]

In 2009 de Vries wrote and directed a feature film, Carmilla Hyde, which won 'Best Feature' at the South Australian Screen Awards in March 2010 after winning 'Best Guerilla Feature' and 'Best Supporting Actress' at the Melbourne Underground Film Festival. Carmilla Hyde has won nine awards, which also include 'Best International Feature' Swansea Bay Film Festival, 'Best International Feature' International Film Festival South Africa, 'Best Australian Feature' Sexy International Film Festival and 'Best Foreign Film' Minneapolis Underground Film Festival.

de Vries has written a number of live action and animation scripts for such film and TV. He is course coordinator of the Advance Production Projects for the Third Year Film & Television students at UniSA, and the Festival Director for the Barossa Film Festival.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Shiell, Annette (Editor) (1998). Bonzer - Australian comics 1900s-1990s. Redhill, South Australia: Elgua Media. p. 120. ISBN 1-876308-12-5. 
  2. ^ a b c "David de Vries". Lambiek Comiclopedia. Retrieved 12 January 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d e "David de Vries". The Comic Book Database. Retrieved 12 January 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c d "David de Vries". Grand Comics Database. Retrieved 12 January 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "Comics". Verve. Retrieved 12 January 2012. 
  6. ^ "Comic Guys". George Negus Tonight. 3 May 2004. Retrieved 12 January 2012. 
  7. ^ Kerr, Joan (2007). "David de Vries". Design and Art Australia. Retrieved 12 January 2012. 

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