Brian Dawkins

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Brian Dawkins
Brian Dawkins.jpg
No. 20
Safety
Personal information
Date of birth: (1973-10-13) October 13, 1973 (age 40)
Place of birth: Jacksonville, Florida
Height: 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m) Weight: 210 lb (95 kg)
Career information
High school: Jacksonville (FL) Raines
College: Clemson
NFL Draft: 1996 / Round: 2 / Pick: 61
Debuted in 1996 for the Philadelphia Eagles
Last played in 2011 for the Denver Broncos
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Tackles 1,131
Quarterback sacks 26.0
Interceptions 37
Stats at NFL.com

Brian Patrick Dawkins (born October 13, 1973), nicknamed Weapon X,[1] is a former American football safety who played in the National Football League (NFL) for sixteen seasons. He played college football for Clemson University. He was drafted by the Philadelphia Eagles in the second round of the 1996 NFL Draft, and played thirteen seasons for Philadelphia. Dawkins played his final three seasons for the Denver Broncos.

A nine-time Pro Bowl selection, Dawkins is a member of the Philadelphia Eagles 75th Anniversary Team, the NFL 2000s All-Decade Team and the 20/20 Club (20 sacks, 20 interceptions). Dawkins will be eligible for induction to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2017.

Early years[edit]

Dawkins was born and raised in Jacksonville, Florida and first saw his future wife in junior high school. He dated Connie Kerrin while attending William M. Raines High School; she was a majorette while he played football and basketball. They graduated in 1992.[2][3]

College career[edit]

Dawkins attended Clemson University in Clemson, South Carolina. A three-year starter at free safety for the Clemson Tigers football team, he finished his career with 247 tackles and 11 interceptions. He received first-team All-ACC Honors in 1995 and was selected by the Associated Press and Sporting News as a second-team All-American as a senior when his team-high six interceptions tied him for the conference lead. He was named the first-team strong safety on Clemson's all-centennial team in 1996 and was selected to their Athletic Hall of Fame in 2009.[4][5] On January 11, 2013, Clemson University established the Brian Dawkins Lifetime Achievement Award to annually honor a former Clemson player for their performance on the field, contributions in leadership and community service.[6][7]

Professional career[edit]

Philadelphia Eagles[edit]

Dawkins was drafted in the second round of the 1996 NFL Draft by the Philadelphia Eagles. [8] As a rookie in 1996, he replaced Eric Zomalt as the starting free safety,[9] remaining in that position throughout his 13 year career in Philadelphia. In 1996, he started 13 of the 14 games he played in, recording 75 tackles, a sack, and three interceptions. Dawkins' rookie season would also see the squad of him, Bobby Taylor, and Troy Vincent form in the Eagles secondary that formed the core of the Eagles defense through 2003, and was instrumental in placing the Eagles among the best defenses in the league.

Dawkins made his first of nine Pro Bowls in 1999, earning a reputation as a hard-hitting ball-hawk[10] with the nickname "Weapon X," a codename of Marvel character Wolverine,[2] the comic book superhero known for relentless aggression. His emergence as one of the premier safeties in the NFL earned him the role of Eagles' defensive captain, and a mainstay on the Eagles.[11]

Dawkins before a 2007 Eagles game.

In 2002 in a game versus the Houston Texans he became the first player in NFL history to record a sack, an interception, forced fumble, and touchdown reception in a single game. This performance, as well as his consistent Pro Bowl-caliber play, earned him a seven-year contract extension at the conclusion of the 2002 season.[12]

In 2004, after three consecutive NFC Championship defeats, the Eagles finally advanced to the Super Bowl with a win over the Atlanta Falcons in the NFC Championship Game. Dawkins played a huge role in the Eagles winning that game, as he intercepted a Michael Vick pass and laid a bone-jarring hit on Falcons tight end Alge Crumpler. The Eagles ultimately would lose to the New England Patriots in the Super Bowl, 24-21. It was Dawkins' first, and only Super Bowl appearance.

During the 2008 season, he became the tenth member of the 20/20 Club and broke the Eagles record for games played surpassing Harold Carmichael who had 180. The 2008 season was a memorable one for Dawkins and the Eagles, as the 5-5-1 team went on a 4-1 surge to make an improbable run to the NFC Championship game where they lost to the Arizona Cardinals, in what turned out to be Dawkins' final game as an Eagle. He is also a member of the 30/30 club of players who have at least 30 interceptions and 30 forced fumbles. He and Charles Tillman are the only players to record at least 35 of each. (Forced Fumbles have only been a recorded stat since 1991)

He finished his career with the Eagles starting 182 of 183 games, recording 898 tackles, 34 interceptions, 32 forced fumbles, and 21 sacks.

Denver Broncos[edit]

On February 28, 2009, Dawkins signed a five-year, $17 million contract with the Denver Broncos. He joined another teammate, Correll Buckhalter, who also signed with the Broncos. The contract included $7.2 million guaranteed and a termination clause that permitted Dawkins to opt out of the contract after two years and receive an extra $1.8 million, virtually making the contract for two years and $9 million. Dawkins could have also earned an additional $10 million in performance incentives.[13][14][15]

Brian Dawkins in 2009 with the Broncos.

On December 29, 2009, the NFL announced that Dawkins was the starter of the AFC Pro Bowl team as a strong safety. Dawkins played in 16 of 16 games for the 2009 Broncos. He totaled 116 tackles and 2 interceptions.

In the following two seasons, injuries hampered Dawkins. In 2010, he compiled 66 tackles and 2 interceptions while only playing in 11 games. Dawkins played in 14 games the following 2011 season, compiling just 38 tackles in limited snaps. He was voted into the 2012 AFC Pro Bowl team as the team's starting strong safety, after an injury to Troy Polamalu prevented him from attending.

Retirements[edit]

After calling Coach John Fox on April 23, 2012, Dawkins announced via Twitter that he was retiring from the NFL. His reasoning was he wanted to retire while he was still healthy. He planned to stay in Colorado, and wanted to begin coaching high school football that fall.[2][16]

On April 28, 2012, Dawkins alongside Jeffrey Lurie announced that he would sign a one-day contract, and retire as a Philadelphia Eagle.[17] The Eagles retired Dawkins's number 20 in a ceremony at halftime of their September 30 game against the New York Giants. The Eagles have only retired 9 player's jerseys in franchise history, which goes back nearly 80 years.[18]

Career Stats[edit]

Defensive Stats

Year Team Games Combined Tackles Tackles Assisted Tackles Sacks Forced Fumbles Fumble Recoveries Fumble Return Yards Interceptions Interception Return Yards Average Yards per Interception Return Longest Interception Return Interceptions Returned for Touchdown Pass Defended Stuffs Stuff Yards
1996 PHI 14 75 53 22 1.0 1 2 0 3 41 14 30 0 9 0 0
1997 PHI 15 75 61 14 0.0 0 0 0 3 76 25 64 1 11 0 0
1998 PHI 14 55 43 12 1.0 1 1 0 2 39 20 30 0 7 0 0
1999 PHI 16 73 52 21 1.5 6 1 0 4 127 32 67 1 24 0 0
2000 PHI 13 70 53 17 2.0 1 1 0 4 62 16 32 0 10 0 0
2001 PHI 15 68 56 12 1.5 2 2 0 2 15 8 15 0 16 4 0
2002 PHI 16 91 62 29 3.0 5 3 0 2 27 14 27 0 11 1 0
2003 PHI 7 35 28 7 0.5 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 6 1 0
2004 PHI 15 69 61 8 3.0 2 1 0 4 40 10 32 0 12 1 0
2005 PHI 16 77 66 11 3.5 4 1 0 3 24 8 24 0 22 2 0
2006 PHI 16 98 76 22 1.0 5 0 0 4 38 10 38 0 13 4 6
2007 PHI 10 37 28 9 0.0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 0 6 3 7
2008 PHI 16 75 64 11 3.0 6 1 0 1 25 25 25 0 6 8 18
2009 DEN 16 116 95 21 0.0 1 3 0 2 0 0 0 0 11 7 19
2010 DEN 11 66 55 11 3.0 6 1 0 1 -2 -2 -2 0 5 1 1
2011 DEN 14 51 38 13 3.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 6 3 4
Total Total 224 1131 891 240 26.0 37 16 0 37 513 14 67 2 175 35 55

[19]

Personal life[edit]

In an interview, Dawkins talked about getting married: "I went to college at Clemson, and she (Connie) transferred there my second year, after one year at Jacksonville University. The night before going back to school our junior year, I asked her to marry me. Her grandfather gave us $100. $59 for my ring and $41 for hers–and we eloped. We went to the Justice of the Peace."[3]

In early 2007, Dawkins and his wife had twin daughters, Chonni and Cionni.[20] Both daughters were born two months premature, but are currently healthy. Dawkins, with his wife, Connie, also have two other children, Brian Jr. and Brionni.[21]

After eloping in 1994, the couple had a wedding ceremony with family and friends at the Palm Beach Breakers Hotel in July 2009.[3]

While with the Eagles, Dawkins had been a resident of Voorhees Township, New Jersey, but put his house there up for sale after joining the Broncos.[22]

After Dawkins signed with the Broncos in 2009, Dan Leone, an Eagles employee who was a gate chief at Lincoln Financial Field was fired by the Eagles after Leone posted messages on his Facebook page expressing his disappointment in the team. Dawkins announced that he would give his two allotted game tickets for the 2009 Eagles-Broncos game to Leone, saying, "I felt it would be a good thing, to reach out to that individual and just let him know how much I appreciate it."[23]

Dawkins' nephew, Dalyn, plays running back for Purdue University.

In 2014, Dawkins joined ESPN as an NFL analyst.

Records and Awards[edit]

  • 9× Pro Bowl (1999, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006, 2008, 2009)
  • 6× All-Pro (1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2006, 2009)
  • 20/20 Club
  • The first player in NFL history to record a sack, an interception, forced fumble, and touchdown reception in a single game
  • The first player in NFL history to record at least 30 interceptions and 30 forced fumbles.
  • "Whizzer" White NFL Man of the Year (2008)
  • Philadelphia Eagles 75th Anniversary Team
  • NFL 2000s All-Decade Team
  • Philadelphia Eagles #20 retired

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Brian Dawkins Becomes Weapon X". marvel.com. Retrieved 2013-11-17. 
  2. ^ a b c Stapleton, Arnie (April 23, 2012). "Jacksonville native Brian Dawkins decides 16 seasons is sweet enough". Florida Times-Union. Retrieved 24 April 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c "Brian Dawkins’ Wife Connie Kerrin". November 27th, 2010. Baller Wives. Retrieved 24 April 2012. 
  4. ^ Brian Dawkins Is Making Bone Crushing Hits In The NFL
  5. ^ Dawkins, Kriese head Clemson Hall of Fame picks
  6. ^ "Clemson Institutes Brian Dawkins Lifetime Achievement Award". Clemson University Athletics. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  7. ^ "Brian Dawkins To Be First Recipient of the Brian Dawkins Lifetime Achievement Award at Clemson". Comcast Sportsnet Philadelphia. Retrieved 12 January 2013. 
  8. ^ "Brian Patrick Dawkins". databaseFootball.com. Retrieved December 21, 2012. 
  9. ^ Patton, Steve (September 19, 1996). "Dawkins arrives and Zomalt exits". Reading Eagle. Retrieved 2011-06-16. 
  10. ^ "Dawkins doesn't miss a trick, or a scoring chance". The Philadelphia Inquirer. October 25, 1999. Retrieved August 2, 2014. 
  11. ^ Heath, John. "Denver’s Brian Dawkins: An Ageless Wolverine". BroncoTalk. Retrieved 24 April 2012. 
  12. ^ "Dawkins signs seven-year extension with Eagles". USA Today. April 28, 2003. 
  13. ^ Broncos sign safety
  14. ^ Dawkins signs five-year deal with Broncos
  15. ^ Brian Dawkins Joins the Broncos
  16. ^ "Denver Broncos Brian Dawkins tweets he will retire from NFL". NFL.COM. Retrieved 24 April 2012. 
  17. ^ CSNPHILLY.COM STAFF (April 27, 2012). "Dawkins to sign one-day contract, retire as Eagle". 
  18. ^ Davis, Nate (September 30, 2012). "Brian Dawkins does pregame dance for Eagles before getting No. 20 jersey retired". USA Today. Retrieved 23 October 2012. 
  19. ^ "Brian Dawkins Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved 20 January 2014. 
  20. ^ With daughters healthy, Eagles' Dawkins looking forward to 2008
  21. ^ Dawkins intensity for the game shows on and off field.
  22. ^ Klein, Michael. "Buy Brian Dawkins' house", The Philadelphia Inquirer, July 16, 2009. Accessed March 17, 2011. "Seven-time Pro Bowler and former Eagle Brian Dawkins is with the Denver Broncos now, and so his house in Voorhees is on the market."
  23. ^ Dawkins Gives Fired Worker 2 Tickets ESPN, April 5, 2009

External links[edit]