Day for night

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This article is about the movie technique. For other meanings, see Day for night (disambiguation).

Day for night, also known as nuit américaine ("American night"), is the name for cinematographic techniques used to simulate a night scene while filming in daylight. Some techniques use tungsten-balanced rather than daylight-balanced film stock or special blue filters; under-exposing the shot (usually in post-production) can create the illusion of darkness or moonlight.

Historically, infrared movie film was used to achieve an equivalent look with black-and-white film.

With digital post-production techniques it is also common to add or intensify glare and light shattering from light sources that would otherwise be less pronounced in daylight, such as windows of indoor lighting, outdoor artificial lights, headlights on cars and more.

The title of François Truffaut's film Day for Night (1973) is a reference to this technique.

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