Days and Nights

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Days and Nights
Days and Nights poster.jpg
Theatrical release poster
Directed by Christian Camargo
Produced by Barbara Romer
Juliet Rylance
Written by Christian Camargo
Starring Christian Camargo
Katie Holmes
William Hurt
Allison Janney
Cherry Jones
Russell Means
Michael Nyqvist
Jean Reno
Juliet Rylance
Mark Rylance
Ben Whishaw
Music by Claire van Kampen
Cinematography Steve Cosens
Edited by Ron Dulin
Sarah Flack
Production
company
Art Cine
Distributed by IFC Films
Release dates
  • November 8, 2013 (2013-11-08) (Denver Film Festival)
  • September 26, 2014 (2014-09-26) (United States)
Running time
91 minutes
Country United States
Language English

Days and Nights is a 2013 American drama film directed and written by Christian Camargo. The film is inspired by The Seagull by Anton Chekhov and set in rural New England in the 1980s.

As part of a special tribute in honor of the actor and activist Russell Means, who died 2012, the film had a special screening at the Denver Film Festival on November 8, 2013.[1]

Days and Nights showed at the 25th Anniversary Palm Springs International Film Festival at the Annenberg Theatre on January 4, 2014.[2] It had its premiere in the United States on September 26, 2014.

Reception[edit]

The film received overwhelming negative reviews and holds a 0% fresh rate at Rotten Tomatoes.[3]

Ken Rudolph recognized that the actors were splendid, but the film seemed trite, and pretentious.[4]

The film critic Thorsten Krüger considers that Camargo "has nothing to tell and nothing to say." [5] The film "intends to be profound, but offers too little to be interesting".

The cast, so packed with talent that Jean Reno and Cherry Jones barely register, is stuck with stagey dialogue. Juliet Rylance, in the Nina part, has a particularly hard time.[6]

The World Cinema Now Program reviewed the film as: "Anton Chekhov’s The Seagull has seen numerous iterations over the decades, but actor/director Christian Camargo (The Hurt Locker) is able to honor the darkness and depth of this Russian tragedy while relocating it to a Memorial Day weekend in rural New England and putting his own contemporary spin on the material. With a haunting score, lovely cinematography, and strong performances from a remarkable ensemble cast, we see a family come together then fracture apart over the course of one disastrous weekend."[7]

The New York Times commented that "“The Seagull,” with its depiction of fin de siècle ennui, has been hollowed out and trivialized. So little time is given to the subsidiary characters in “Days and Nights” that, at times, the movie barely makes sense. The avian symbol has been changed from a sea gull to a bald eagle. What remains is a cracked shell." [8]

References[edit]

External links[edit]