DeKalb County High School

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DeKalb County High School
DeKalb County High School, Smithville, Tennessee - 05-27-2013.JPG
Address
1130 W. Broad Street
Smithville, Tennessee, 37166
United States
Information
School type Public secondary
Principal Patrick Cripps
Asst. Principal Kathy Bryant
David Gash
Grades 9-12
Number of students ~834 (beginning of 2013-2014 school year)[1]
Language English
Color(s) Black and Gold
Slogan Tiger Pride
Mascot Tiger
Team name DeKalb County Fighting Tigers
Vision Wiring students to learn, achieve, and succeed
Affiliations Tennessee Secondary School Athletic Association
Website

DeKalb County High School is located in Smithville, Tennessee. It is the only high school in the county and serves grades 9-12 with an enrollment of 834 as of August 14, 2013.[1] The school's mascot is a tiger and the school colors are black and gold. The principal is Patrick Cripps and the assistant principals are David Gash and Kathy Bryant.[2]

Giggin for Grads controversy[edit]

Giggin for Grads is a fund raiser that involves capturing wild frogs by impaling them with a sharp weapon, a process called gigging. The event, organized by the DeKalb County Young Farmers and Ranchers, isn't affiliated with the high school and is held to help fund an agricultural scholarship for a DeKalb County student. The event has been considered abusive to frogs by PeTA and other concerned agencies. Organizers have been urged to cancel the event,[3] but it has been held for two consecutive years.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Dwayne Page (August 14, 2013). "Student Enrollment Up By Ten Students Over Last Year, Numbers Show More Boys than Girls". WJLE. Retrieved August 18, 2013. 
  2. ^ "DCHS". Retrieved August 18, 2013. 
  3. ^ Dwayne Page (June 25, 2013). "Animal Rights Activists Seeking to Stop "Giggin' for Grads" in DeKalb County". WJLE. Retrieved July 5, 2013. 
  4. ^ Dwayne Page (June 28, 2014). "Animal Rights Activists Return to Protest "Giggin for Grads"". WJLE. Retrieved July 13, 2014.