De facto currency

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A de facto currency is a unit of money that is not legal tender in a country but is treated as such by most of the populace. The United States dollar and the European Union euro are the most common de facto currencies.

Euro[edit]

The following countries use the euro as their de facto currency:

United States dollar[edit]

The following countries use the USD as their de facto currency:

Russian ruble[edit]

The following disputed territories have the Russian ruble as their de facto currency:

South African rand and Botswana pula[edit]

Due to hyperinflation in Zimbabwe in 2006 to 2008, the government of Zimbabwe has allowed circulation of foreign currency since September 2008 and local currency became obsolete since 12 April 2009. Both South African rand and Botswana pula circulate in Zimbabwe.

References[edit]