Deadly Medicine

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Deadly Medicine
Deadly Medicine cover.jpg
Cover of 1991 paperback edition
Author Kelly Moore, Dan Reed
Country United States
Language English
Genre Nonfiction, true crime
Publisher St. Martin's Press
Publication date
November 1988
Media type Print (Hardback, Paperback, Audio Book)

Deadly Medicine is a 1988 non-fiction true crime book by Kelly Moore and Dan Reed that was adapted for television in 1991, as an NBC Movie-of-the-Week by the same name. The book was first published in November 1988 and focused on the murder case of convicted serial killer Genene Jones.[1]

Summary[edit]

The book chronicles the murder case of convicted serial killer Genene Jones, a pediatric nurse from San Antonio, Texas, who murdered between 11 and 46 infants during 1981 and 1982 by inducing Code Blue emergencies through fatal overdoses of prescription medications such as heparin. The book relies on interviews with the victims' families, the investigators, the attorneys, and Jones herself. The authors summarize the 1984 murder trial and theorize that Jones intentionally triggered medical issues in the infants to act as a hero during the resultant Code Blue emergencies.[2]

Critical reception[edit]

General reception for the book was positive and Deadly Medicine was a New York Times Bestseller for seven weeks.[3] The book received positive reviews,[4] with the Los Angeles Times writing that it was "distinguished by thorough research and a keen understanding of human character—even of Jones' motivation."[5]

Booklist specifically noted the book's "chilling veracity," deeming it "striking for the feeling of horrifying powerlessness it provokes as Jones murders again and again."[6] According to Kirkus, Deadly Medicine is "an engrossing and readable shocker."[6]

Deadly Medicine was listed on The Sunday Telegraph's Local Best Sellers in paperback in November 1989.[7]

Television adaptation[edit]

In 1991 the book was adapted into a made for television movie starring Veronica Hamel as pediatrician Kathleen Holland and Susan Ruttan as Genene Jones.[8][9] Moore and Reed's book was adapted by screenwriters Vicki Polon, L. Virginia Browne, and Andrew Laskos, and directed by Richard Colla for NBC.[10] Reception for the film was mostly positive.[11][12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Investigative effort details `Texas Baby Murders'". Austin American-Statesman. August 13, 1989. Retrieved 26 April 2013. 
  2. ^ Moore, Kelly and Dan Reed. Deadly Medicine. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1988.
  3. ^ "PAPERBACK BEST SELLERS LIST: November 12, 1989". New York Times. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  4. ^ "Investigative effort details `Texas Baby Murders'". Austin American-Statesman. August 13, 1989. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  5. ^ "Review: DEADLY MEDICINE". LA Times. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  6. ^ a b Moore, Kelly; Reed, Dan (October 1989). Deadly Medicine. New York: St. Martin's Paperbacks. ISBN 0312915799. 
  7. ^ The Telegraph - Google News Archive Search
  8. ^ "TV MOVIE BASED ON MURDER CASE M.H. AUTHORS WROTE ABOUT TEXAS NURSE". San Jose Mercury News. November 11, 1991. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  9. ^ Variety and Daily Variety: Television Reviews, 1991-1992. Variety. 1994. ISBN 0824037960. 
  10. ^ "`Medicine' triggers catharsis for real-life doctor". Austin American-Statesman. November 11, 1991. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  11. ^ "TV REVIEW Deadly Medicine (1991)". Entertainment Weekly. Retrieved 26 April 2013. 
  12. ^ "TV Reviews : A Case of Baby Killings in 'Deadly Medicine'". LA Times. Retrieved 3 May 2013. 
  13. ^ "Winning Combination Hamel, Ruttan Carry Nbc`s `Deadly Medicine`". Chicago Tribune. Retrieved 3 May 2013.