Dear Dad... Three

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"Dear Dad... Three"
M*A*S*H episode
Episode no. Season 2
Episode 9 (33rd overall)
Directed by Don Weis
Written by

Larry Gelbart

Laurence Marks
Production code K409
Original air date November 10, 1973
Guest actors
Episode chronology
← Previous
"The Trial of Henry Blake"
Next →
"The Sniper"
List of M*A*S*H episodes

Dear Dad... Three was the 33rd episode of the M*A*S*H television series, and the ninth episode of season two. The episode aired on November 10, 1973.

Plot[edit]

Hawkeye writes another letter home to his father, detailing some of the recent events at the 4077th: amongst the latest batch of wounded is a soldier with a live grenade shot into his body, and Sergeant Condon, who reminds the doctors to give him the "right type" of blood. Hawkeye, Trapper and Ginger decide to teach Condon a lesson on racial awareness. The monthly staff meeting was also held - although the previous meeting was held six months ago - and the latest meeting appears to be no more productive than the previous one, which, according to Radar's minutes, was "declared a shambles". Henry also receives a home movie of his daughter's birthday party from his wife, which he watches in his office with Hawkeye, Trapper and Radar - along with footage from a few years previous of Henry and his wife goofing in front of the camera with their neighbours.

Notes[edit]

This was the first of three episodes to feature home movies in the episode plot. The season three episode There Is Nothing Like A Nurse featured the main male characters, minus Frank Burns, watching a home movie of Frank's wedding, and the season four episode Mail Call...Again featured the main characters watching a movie of Radar's family sitting down to Sunday lunch at the family farm in Ottumwa, Iowa.

This episode also contains a claim that Dr. Charles Drew, known for his pioneering work with blood plasma, died in a North Carolina hospital which refused to admit him or treat his injuries based on his race. This claim is false.[1][2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Question of the Month: The Truth About the Death of Charles Drew". Jim Crow Museum of Racist Memorabilia. June 2004. Retrieved June 24, 2014.
  2. ^ "Did the black doctor who invented blood plasma die because white doctors wouldn't treat him?". The Straight Dope. November 1989. Retrieved June 24, 2014.