Debbie Ryan

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For the actress and singer, see Debby Ryan.
Debbie Ryan
Sport(s) Basketball
Biographical details
Born (1952-11-04) November 4, 1952 (age 61)
Titusville, New Jersey
Playing career
1971-1975 Ursinus College
Position(s) Point Guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1977-2011 Virginia
Head coaching record
Overall 736-323 (.695)
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Final Four Appearances - 1990, 1991, 1992
NCAA Championship Game Appearance - 1991
ACC Regular-Season Champions - 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 2000
ACC Tournament Champions - 1990, 1992, 1993
Awards
ACC Coach of the Year - 1984, 1985, 1987, 1991, 1993, 1995, 2000
Naismith College Coach of the Year - 1991
Virginia state Coach of the Year - 1981, 1995, 2000, 2002

Debbie Ryan (born November 4, 1952) is the former head coach for the women's basketball team at the University of Virginia. Ryan also coached the American women's basketball team at the 2003 Pan American Games. She was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2000 but is currently in remission.[1] She was inducted into the Women's Basketball Hall of Fame in 2008. Ryan was also inducted into the Virginia Sports Hall of Fame in 2012. [2]

The US Basketball Writers Association (USBWA) awarded her the Coach of the Year award in 1991.[3]

In 1977, Ryan had recently completed graduate school in Virginia when she was asked to become the head coach of the women's basketball program. She accepted, to become only the third head coach in the program's history.[1] Ryan resigned after 34 years of head coaching duties at UVA at the completion the women's 2010-2011 basketball season.[4][5] After her resignation, Ryan was a volunteer assistant coach of Seattle Storm for the 2011 WNBA season, reuniting with her former player Jenny Boucek, who is an assistant coach there.[6]

USA Basketball[edit]

Ryan served as the head coach of the USA representative to the 1999 World University Games (also known as the Universiade). The event was held in Palma de Mallorca, Spain. The USA team opened with a 134–37 win over South Africa. The second game was against Canada, which the USA team lost in a close match 68–67. The USA could not afford to lose another game if they wished to win a medal, and won the next game against Japan 106–66. The USA next faced undefeated Russia, and fell behind by twelve points at halftime, but came back and won the game 79–68. The USA fell behind in their next game against undefeated China, but rallied and went on to win 89–78. The USA then beat Brazil to advance to the semi-final, where they faced Lithuania. The game was not close, with the USA winning 70–49. That set up a rematch with China, on their home court with 18,000 spectators. The USA only had a four point lead at halftime, but did better in the second half, and won 87–69 to claim the gold medal.[7]

Head coaching record[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Virginia (ACC) (1977–2011)
1977-1978 Virginia 8-17 1-5
1978-1979 Virginia 16-12 2-4
1979-1980 Virginia 20-12 3-5 WNIT Second Round
1980-1981 Virginia 22-10 5-2 AIAW First Round
1981-1982 Virginia 17-11 2-5
1982-1983 Virginia 15-13 4-9
1983-1984 Virginia 22-7 11-3 NCAA First Round
1984-1985 Virginia 21-8 9-5 NCAA First Round
1985-1986 Virginia 26-3 13-1 NCAA First Round
1986-1987 Virginia 26-5 12-2 NCAA Sweet 16
1987-1988 Virginia 27-5 12-2 NCAA Elite 8
1988-1989 Virginia 21-10 8-6 NCAA Sweet 16
1989-1990 Virginia 29-6 11-3 NCAA Final Four
1990-1991 Virginia 31-3 14-0 NCAA Finals
1991-1992 Virginia 32-2 15-1 NCAA Final Four
1992-1993 Virginia 26-6 13-3 NCAA Elite Eight
1993-1994 Virginia 27-5 15-1 NCAA Sweet 16
1994-1995 Virginia 27-5 16-0 NCAA Elite Eight
1995-1996 Virginia 26-7 13-3 NCAA Elite Eight
1996-1997 Virginia 23-8 12-4 NCAA Sweet 16
1997-1998 Virginia 19-10 9-7 NCAA Second Round
1998-1999 Virginia 20-9 12-4 NCAA First Round
1999-2000 Virginia 25-9 13-3 NCAA Sweet 16
2000-2001 Virginia 18-14 8-8 NCAA First Round
2001-2002 Virginia 17-13 9-7 NCAA First Round
2002-2003 Virginia 17-14 9-7 NCAA Second Round
2003-2004 Virginia 13-16 6-9
2004-2005 Virginia 21-11 8-6 NCAA Second Round
2005-2006 Virginia 20-12 5-9 WNIT Quarterfinals
2006-2007 Virginia 19-15 5-9 WNIT Quarterfinals
2007-2008 Virginia 24-10 10-4 NCAA Second Round
2008-2009 Virginia 24-10 8-6 NCAA Second Round
2009-2010 Virginia 21-10 9-5 NCAA First Round
2010-2011 Virginia 16-15 5-9 WNIT Quarterfinals
Virginia: 736-323 (.695) 160-92 (.635)
Total: 736-323 (.695)

      National champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Friedman, Vickie (June 2011). "The End of Two Eras". Coaching Women's Basketball (Post-convention issue): 22. 
  2. ^ "WBHOF Inductees". WBHOF. Retrieved 2009-08-01. 
  3. ^ "USBWA WOMEN'S HONORS". USBWA. Retrieved 8 May 2010. 
  4. ^ (2011-03-12) "Virginia coach Ryan to step down after 34 years", Associated Press. Retrieved 2011-03-21.
  5. ^ (2011-03-26 )"Debbie Ryan's career ends as Virginia's late run isn't enough to beat Charlotte", ESPN. Retrieved 2011-03-28.
  6. ^ http://www.wnba.com/storm/news/coppa120913.html
  7. ^ "TWENTIETH WORLD UNIVERSITY GAMES -- 2001". USA Basketball. Retrieved 22 May 2013. 

External links[edit]